USGS Visual Identifier

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Geologic Unit: Utica

Publication:
Emmons, Ebenezer, 1842, Geology of New York; Part II, Survey of 
   the second geological district: New York State Museum, 437 
   p.
Usage in Publication:
Utica slate

Modifications: Geologic Province: Dominant Lithology:
 Named
 Appalachian basin
 Shale

Summary:
Name Utica slate used to refer to black shaly mass, 75 ft thick, underlying Lorraine shales and overlying Trenton limestone.
Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Publication:
Ruedemann, Rudolf, 1925, The Utica and Lorraine formations of 
   New York; Part I, Stratigraphy: New York State Museum Bulletin, 
   no. 258, 175 p.
Usage in Publication:
Utica shale

Modifications: Geologic Province: Dominant Lithology:
 Overview
 Areal limits
 Appalachian basin
 

Summary:
Utica shale underlies Lorraine group and overlies Trenton limestone in Utica basin, and overlies Canajoharie shale in middle Mohawk Valley. Is 70 to 1,000 ft thick in Utica basin. Unit is nearly 800 ft thick at Utica, but only upper 250 ft is exposed.
Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Publication:
Kay, G.M., 1937, Stratigraphy of the Trenton group: Geological 
   Society of America Bulletin, v. 48, no. 2, p. 233-302.
Usage in Publication:
Utica shale

Modifications: Geologic Province: Dominant Lithology:
 Overview
 Appalachian basin
 

Summary:
Nomenclature of Utica shale is complex and confusing. At type locality, the Utica is probably wholly upper Utica, but in sections a few mi east of the city, the formation is separable into three faunal divisions. Lower two are probably of Cobourg age, but upper seems equivalent to Deer River and Atwater Creek shales of northwestern NY and to Collingwood and Gloucester formations of Ontario. Thus, a single member of the Utica, when traced laterally, becomes equivalent to two formations. It is confusing to consider the zones of the Utica as members of the formation. Nowadaga member has been defined as "Lower Utica or zone of CLIMACOGRAPTUS TYPICALIS (Hall). Loyal Creek member has been defined as "middle Utica, or zone of DICRANOGRAPTUS NICHOLSONI" Hopkinson. Holland Patent member is "upper Utica, or zone of CLIMACOGRAPTUS PYGMEUS" and GLOSSOGRAPTUS QUADRIMUCRONATUS TIMIDUS of Ruedemann. Overlies Canajoharie. [Members later abandoned by Fisher (1977).]
Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Publication:
Wilmarth, M.G., 1938, [Geologic Names Committee remarks], IN 
   Wilmarth, M.G., 1938, Lexicon of geologic names of the United 
   States (including Alaska): U.S. Geological Survey Bulletin, 
   896, pts. 1-2, 2396 p.
Usage in Publication:
Utica shale*

Modifications: Geologic Province: Dominant Lithology:
 Overview
 Appalachian basin
 

Summary:
In 1911 (NY State Museum Bulletin 149, p. 10-12), J.M. Clarke separated, under name Canajoharie shale, the lower part of black shale previously included in Utica shale of Hudson and Mohawk Valleys, which he stated thins out westward, does not reach meridian of Utica and contains a Trenton fauna. In 1912, (NY State Museum Bulletin 162), R. Ruedemann stated that true Utica shale is absent in the Hudson River region, but that it is overlain by true Frankfort shale in Utica region.
Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Publication:
Bergstrom, S.M., and Mitchell, C.E., 1990, The Utica Shale in 
   northern Ohio and its relationships to the Utica Shale of 
   the northern Appalachian basin and lithologically similar 
   rocks in the central Great Lakes region: Appalachian Basin 
   Industrial Associates, v. 17, p. 2-39.
Usage in Publication:
Utica Shale

Modifications: Geologic Province: Dominant Lithology:
 Areal limits
 Overview
 Age modified
 Appalachian basin
 Cincinnati arch
 Michigan basin
 

Summary:
Utica Shale is one of the geographically most widely recognized lower Paleozoic stratigraphic units in the eastern Midcontinent. Present investigation centers on the unit in northern OH where it was first recognized by Orton (1888). Lower Utica here has been mapped previously as Cynthiana or Point Pleasant Formations. Graptolites show that in OH and IN, unit ranges from late Middle Ordovician to middle Late Ordovician. A tongue of the Utica extends westward and can be traced into the lower Maquoketa Group in the Upper Mississippi Valley, but the main distribution area of the Utica lithofacies is east of the WI-MI and IL-IN borders. Shows considerable age differences locally and regionally. In Seneca Co., where thickness varies from less than 100 ft to about 350 ft, unit is Cincinnatian (middle Edenian to middle-upper Maysvillian). Contact with underlying Trenton Limestone is disconformable and graptolite evidence indicates that missing strata corresponds to the lower Edenian and possibly upper Mohawkian. Utica is stratigraphically most extensive in the Sebee Trough in southwestern OH and southeastern IN.
Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Publication:
Ryder, R.T., Harris, A.G., and Repetski, J.E., 1992, Stratigraphic 
   framework of Cambrian and Ordovician rocks in the central 
   Appalachian basin from Medina County, Ohio, through southwestern 
   and south-central Pennsylvania to Hampshire County, West 
   Virginia, IN Evolution of sedimentary basins; Appalachian 
   basin: U.S. Geological Survey Bulletin, 1839-K, p. K1-K32.
Usage in Publication:
Utica Shale*

Modifications: Geologic Province: Dominant Lithology:
 Age modified
 Appalachian basin
 

Summary:
In section C-C' the Utica Shale is of Middle Ordovician, Shermanian age based on correlations to PA. [This refutes the Late Ordovician, Edenian age assigned to the Utica by Ryder (1992, USGS Misc. Inv. Series Map, I-2264; 1992, USGS Bull.1839-G, p. G1-G25).]
Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Publication:
Ryder, R.T., 1992, Stratigraphic framework of Cambrian and 
   Ordovician rocks in the central Appalachian basin from Morrow 
   County, Ohio, to Pendleton County, West Virginia, IN Evolution 
   of sedimentary basins; Appalachian basin: U.S. Geological 
   Survey Bulletin, 1839-G, p. G1-G25.
Usage in Publication:
Utica Shale*

Modifications: Geologic Province: Dominant Lithology:
 Areal limits
 Age modified
 Appalachian basin
 

Summary:
In cross section E-E', in the subsurface of eastern OH, Utica Shale is used for dark-gray to black shale and argillaceous, micritic limestone that correlates with the upper part of the Trenton Group. Includes Cynthiana Formation of Calvert (1964). Utica preferred over Cynthiana because it more closely resembles black shale beds of the Utica in PA and NY. Age is Late Ordovician (Edenian) based on fossils. [This age assignment subsequently refuted by Ryder and others, 1992, USGS Bull.1839-K, p. K1-K32.]
Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Publication:
Goldman, Daniel, Mitchell, C.E., Bergstrom, S.M., Delano, J.W., 
   and Tice, Steven, 1994, K-bentonites and graptolite 
   biostratigraphy in the Middle Ordovician of New York State 
   and Quebec; a new chronostratigraphic model: Palaios, v. 9, 
   no. 2, p. 124-143.
Usage in Publication:
Utica Shale

Modifications: Geologic Province: Dominant Lithology:
 Revised
 Figure
 Overview
 Appalachian basin
 

Summary:
The Utica Shale is divided in the Mohawk Valley into upper and lower parts by a tongue of the Dolgeville Formation and these parts are here assigned member names. The lower portion of the Utica is named the Flat Creek Member and the upper, the Indian Castle Member. These lithostratigraphic units replace earlier names such as the Canajoharie Shale, which are primarily biostratigraphic. Revised stratigraphic correlations based on reinterpretation of graptolites and K-bentonites in the area suggest that the lower part of the Utica Shale is the lateral equivalent of a large part of the lower Trenton Group and is older than the Denley Limestone, with which it has been previously equated. The Flat Creek Member overlies the early to middle Kirkfieldian Kings Falls Limestone of the Trenton Group at Canajoharie Creek and interfingers with the Sugar River Limestone of the Trenton Group to the west. The Trenton-Utica succession is a transgressive sequence. Westward, the Dolgeville grades into the lower Denley and the Utica (equivalent to only the upper Utica of the east) disconformably overlies the Denley and Steuben Limestones of the Trenton Group. The Utica underlies the Frankfort Formation throughout the study area. Age of the Utica between Chuctanunda Creek and Caroga Creek, ranges from Kirkfieldian (Mohawkian) to Edenian (Cincinnatian). Formation youngs westward and at Trenton Falls the entire unit is shown as Maysvillian (Cincinnatian). The following figure is adapted from Fig. 14 of Goldman and others (1994). Their cross-section shows age and facies relationships of the Utica Shale, Trenton Group, and adjacent units. The columns shown here were extracted from that diagram in an attempt to show the time transgressive nature of the Utica and the stratigraphic position of its newly named members. Ages and relationships are approximate. Dashed lines are used where contacts are gradational or interfingering. [Sorry folks, I have not yet included GNU's figure --came over from cd-rom as gibberish. For time being, please see fig. 14 of Goldman and others (1994)]
Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Publication:
Frey, R.C., 1995, Middle and Upper Ordovician nautiloid cephalopods 
   of the Cincinnati arch region of Kentucky, Indiana, and Ohio, 
   IN Pojeta, John, Jr., ed., Contributions to the Ordovician 
   paleontology of Kentucky and nearby states: U.S. Geological 
   Survey Professional Paper, 1066-P, p. P1-P126.
Usage in Publication:
Utica Shale*

Modifications: Geologic Province: Dominant Lithology:
 Overview
 Appalachian basin
 

Summary:
Nautiloid fauna of Clays Ferry Formation of KY and of Kope Formation of IN and OH are most similar to those of coeval Utica Shale in NY and Whitby Formation in southern Ontario.
Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).