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Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Jefferson City limestone
  • Dominant lithology:
    • Limestone
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Ozark uplift
Publication:

Winslow, Arthur, 1894, Lead and zinc deposits: Missouri Bureau of Geology and Mines Report, v. 6-7, 763 p.


Summary:

Pg. 331, 373, 375. Jefferson City limestone. Magnesium limestones, 175 feet thick, underlying Roubidoux or Saccharoidal sandstone [not Roubidoux, but St. Peter sandstone] and overlying Moreau sandstone [Roubidoux formation] in central Missouri. Forms top part of Gasconade limestone [an early broad usage of Gasconade]. [Age is Early Ordovician (Beekmantown).]
[Named from exposures at Jefferson City, Cole Co., MO.]

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 896, p. 1041-1042); supplemental information from GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Denver GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Jefferson City limestone
  • Modifications:
    • Contact revised
    • Areal extent
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Ozark uplift
Publication:

Ball, S.H., and Smith, A.F., 1903, The geology of Miller County, with an introduction by E.R. Buckley: Missouri Bureau of Geology and Mines, 2nd series, v. 1, 207 p.


Summary:

Jefferson City limestone. Conformably overlies St. Elizabeth formation (new); unconformably underlies Pacific sandstone (new). Exposed in Miller County, Missouri, north and south of Osage River. Thickness up to 200 feet; averages 100 feet south of river and 60 feet north of river. Age is Cambrian and Ordovician.

Source: Modified from GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Denver GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Jefferson City formation
  • Modifications:
    • Areal extent
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Appalachian basin
Publication:

Oder, C.R.L., 1934, Preliminary subdivision of the Knox dolomite in east Tennessee: Journal of Geology, v. 42, no. 5, p. 469-497.


Summary:

Pg. 474 (table 1), 484-486. Jefferson City formation. Geographically extended into eastern Tennessee where classified as formation in Knox dolomite. Occupies interval between top of Nittany and base of Cotter-Powell beds. Consists of 55 to 400 feet of thin- to heavy-bedded, dove- and dark- to brownish-gray fine-grained limestone and extremely light- to dark-green fine-grained to dense dolomite. Thin greenish-blue siliceous shales present on some bedding planes; coarse edgewise limestone conglomerates present locally. [Age is Early Ordovician.]

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 1200, p. 1917-1918).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Jefferson City dolomite*
    • Jefferson City limestone
  • Modifications:
    • Overview
Publication:

Wilmarth, M.G., 1936, [Selected Geologic Names Committee remarks (ca. 1936) on Cambrian and Ordovician rocks of the U.S.], IN Wilmarth, M.G., 1938, Lexicon of geologic names of the United States (including Alaska): U.S. Geological Survey Bulletin, 896, pts. 1-2, 2396 p.


Summary:

Until 1911 the name Jefferson City limestone was applied to all rocks in Missouri underlying "Saccharoidal sandstone" and overlying Roubldoux formation, and it has been thus applied in some later reports. In 1911 (GSA Bull., v. 22, pl. 27) E.O. Ulrich defined Jefferson City limestone as indicated by following succession (downward): St. Peter sandstone; Everton; unconformity; Yellville limestone; unconformity; Jefferson City; Roubidoux. According to A.H. Purdue and H.D. Miser, 1916 (USGS Eureka Springs-Harrison folio, No. 202, p. 5), the Jefferson City limestone of Ulrlch's 1911 report cited above included Cotter dolomite and Jefferson City dolomite of present nomenclature; and in 1912 Ulrich determined that his Cotter dolomite is younger than Jefferson City dolomite at its type locality, and restricted Jefferson City to the beds beneath the Cotter. This is present commonly accepted definition. [See also under †Jefferson City group.]

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 896, p. 1041-1042).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Jefferson City group
  • Modifications:
    • Revised
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Ozark uplift
Publication:

Cullison, J.S., 1944, The stratigraphy of some lower Ordovician formations of the Ozark uplift [Missouri and Arkansas]: University of Missouri School of Mines and Metallurgy Bulletin, Technical Series, v. 15, no. 2, 112 p.


Summary:

Pg. 15, 17-32. Jefferson City group. Term Jefferson City has had many usages in the literature since originally defined by Winslow. Term should be dropped from the literature because of this. It is retained in this report as group term for following reasons: (1) a boundary between Rich Fountain and Theodosia formations (both new) is present within those beds originally defined as Jefferson City by Winslow; (2) predominant usage of them by most writers since Winslow has been in sense of group, even though it has not been defined as such; (3) term too well established in Missouri stratigraphic literature to be disposed of especially when beds involved are essentially same as those of previous usage. Underlies Cotter formation; unconformably overlies Roubidoux formation. [Age is Early Ordovician.]

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 1200, p. 1917-1918).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Jefferson City formation
  • Modifications:
    • Areal extent
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Ozark uplift
Publication:

Grawe, O.R., 1945, Pyrite deposits of Missouri: Missouri Division of Geological Survey and Water Resources Report, 2nd series, v. 30, 482 p.


Summary:

Pg. 52 (fig. 2), 59-62. Term Jefferson City formatton used in this report [pyrite deposits of Missouri] in its older, unrestricted sense to include all dolomite beds above top of Roubidoux formation. [Age is Early Ordovician.]

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 1200, p. 1917-1918).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Jefferson City formation
  • Modifications:
    • Not used
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Appalachian basin
Publication:

Bridge, Josiah, 1956, Stratigraphy of the Mascot-Jefferson City zinc district, Tennessee: U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper, 277, 76 p. [Available online from the USGS PubsWarehouse: http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/pp/pp277]


Summary:

Pg. 23. Kingsport limestone replaces Jefferson City formatton as used by Oder (1934). Jefferson City, Cotter, and Powell are names of formations exposed in Missouri and Arkansas, and there is no possibility that they can be traced into Appalachian Valley.

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 1200, p. 1917-1918).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • [Cotter Dolomite and Jefferson City Dolomite, undifferentiated]
  • Modifications:
    • Overview
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Central Kansas uplift
    • Nemaha anticline
    • Chautauqua platform
Publication:

Zeller, D.E. (editor), 1968, The stratigraphic succession in Kansas: Kansas Geological Survey Bulletin, no. 189, 81 p. [Available online from the Kansas Geological Survey: http://www.kgs.ku.edu/Publications/Bulletins/189]


Summary:

(Paleozoic Era; [Cambrian through Mississippian Systems] by E.D. Goebel, p. 13.) Jefferson City Dolomite and Cotter Dolomite. Because the Cotter Dolomite and Jefferson City Dolomite recognized in outcrops are not distinctly separable in the subsurface on lithologic criteria, they are treated as a unit. They consist mainly of coarsely granular, cherty dolomite. The upper part of the sequence includes much oolitic chert which becomes white and decreases in volume toward the base where white, tripolitic chert becomes abundant. These rocks unconformably underlie different formations, such as the St. Peter Sandstone on the flank of the Southeast Nebraska arch, the Chattanooga Shale on the Chautauqua arch, and Pennsylvanian rocks on parts of the Central Kansas uplift and Nemaha anticline. The Jefferson City Dolomite probably is conformable on the Roubidoux Formation. The Cotter-Jefferson City sequence ranges in thickness from 0 feet in northern Kansas to more than 650 feet in Cowley County in southern Kansas. Age is Late Cambrian to Early Ordovician.

Source: Publication.


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Jefferson City Dolomite
  • Modifications:
    • Areal extent
    • Overview
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Ozark uplift
Publication:

Nelson, W.J., 1996, Bedrock geology of the Paducah 1 degree x 2 degrees quadrangle, Illinois, Kentucky, and Missouri: Illinois Geological Survey Bulletin, no. 102, 40 p., (incl. geologic map, scale 1:100,000)


Summary:

Ordovician (Canadian) Jefferson City Dolomite crops out along irregular faulted belt along western edge of quad. Mapping of Canadian rocks in southeastern MO is based on character of residual soils; Jefferson City yields distinctive residuum of red to yellow plastic clay containing abundant fragments of porous, partly oolitic chert. Contact with underlying Roubidoux Formation is probably unconformable (M.A. Middendorf, Missouri Division of Geology and Land Survey, written commun., 1989).

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Jefferson City Dolomite*
  • Modifications:
    • Areal extent
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Illinois basin
    • Ozark uplift
Publication:

Harrison, R.W., 1997, Bedrock geologic map of the St. Louis 30' x 60' quadrangle, Missouri and Illinois: U.S. Geological Survey Miscellaneous Investigations Series Map, I-2533, 2 sheets, 7 p., scale 1:100,000 [http://ngmdb.usgs.gov/Prodesc/proddesc_13024.htm]


Summary:

Jefferson City Dolomite of Early Ordovician (Canadian) age occurs in MO and IL in the subsurface and in MO at the surface. Also mapped undivided with Cotter Dolomite.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Jefferson City Dolomite*
  • Modifications:
    • Areal extent
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Ozark uplift
Publication:

Nelson, W.J., 1998, Bedrock geology of the Paducah 1 degree x 2 degrees CUSMAP quadrangle, Illinois, Kentucky, and Missouri, IN The Paducah CUSMAP quadrangle, resource and topographical investigations: U.S. Geological Survey Bulletin, 2150-B, p. B1-B36, (incl. geologic map, scale 1:250,000), A joint study conducted with Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, and Missouri geol. surveys [http://ngmdb.usgs.gov/Prodesc/proddesc_19757.htm]


Summary:

Ordovician (Canadian) Jefferson City, Cotter, Powell, and Smithville Dolomites not mapped consistently between adjacent 7.5-minutes quads within Paducah quad. All consist of more or less silty, sandy, and cherty dolomite. Indistinguishable in subsurface except possibly through study of insoluble residues. Sequence in subsurface is equivalent to Shakopee Dolomite in IL and KY.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Jefferson City Dolomite*
  • Modifications:
    • Areal extent
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Upper Mississippi embayment
    • Illinois basin
Publication:

Harrison, R.W., 1999, Geologic map of the Thebes quadrangle, Missouri and Illinois: U.S. Geological Survey Geologic Quadrangle Map, GQ-1779, scale 1:24,000 [http://ngmdb.usgs.gov/Prodesc/proddesc_19294.htm]


Summary:

Early Ordovician (Canadian) Jefferson City Dolomite mapped undivided with Cotter Dolomite in subsurface in Upper Mississippi embayment of MO and Illinois basin in IL.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • [Cotter Dolomite and Jefferson City Dolomite, undifferentiated]
    • [Cotter Formation and Jefferson City Formation, undifferentiated]
  • Modifications:
    • Overview
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Ozark uplift
Publication:

McFarland, J.D. (compiler), 2004, Stratigraphic summary of Arkansas: Arkansas Geological Commission Information Circular, no. 36 (Revised), 39 p. [Available online from the Arkansas Geological Survey.]


Summary:

Pg. 3. The Jefferson City consists of light to dark tan, fine-grained, crystalline dolostone and considerable chert with some rare thin beds of sandstone, shale, and oolite. Few fossils are known from the "Jeff City". The Jefferson City Dolomite unconformably overlies Roubidoux Formation. This lower contact is not exposed in Arkansas. The Jefferson City Formation has not been successfully differentiated from the Cotter Formation in Arkansas. Present in northern Arkansas, Ozark Plateaus; Missouri. Age is Early Ordovician.
Named for exposures at Jefferson City, Cole Co., MO (Winslow, 1894).

Source: Publication.


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For more information, please contact Nancy Stamm, Geologic Names Committee Secretary.

Asterisk (*) indicates usage by the U.S. Geological Survey. Other usages by state geological surveys.

"No current usage" (†) implies that a name has been abandoned or has fallen into disuse. Former usage and, if known, replacement name given in parentheses ( ).

Slash (/) indicates name does not conform with nomenclatural guidelines (CSN, 1933; ACSN, 1961, 1970; NACSN, 1983, 2005). This may be explained within brackets ([ ]).