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Geologic Unit: Hanover
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  • Usage in publication:
    • Hanover shales
  • Modifications:
    • Original reference
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Appalachian basin
Publication:

Hartnagel, C.A., 1912, Classification of the geologic formations of the State of New York: New York State Museum Handbook, no. 19, 96 p.


Summary:

Pg. 76. Hanover shales (nom. nov.). Name is from exposures in town of Hanover, Chautauqua County, western New York, and is here used in place of †Silver Creek (preoccupied). Excellent exposures in Walnut and Silver Creek Ravines. Equivalent to upper part of Hatch shale and flags of eastern sections. [Age is Late Devonian.]

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 896, Silver Creek entry p. 1998).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Hanover shales
  • Modifications:
    • Areal extent
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Appalachian basin
Publication:

Chadwick, G.H., 1919, Remarkable persistence of thin horizons: Geological Society of America Bulletin, v. 30, p. 157.


Summary:

Pg. 157. Hanover shales much younger than Hatch shales and = Wiscoy shales. Disconformably overlie Angola shales and disconformably underlie Dunkirk black shale. [Age is Late Devonian.]

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 896, Silver Creek entry p. 1998).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Hanover shale
  • Modifications:
    • Revised
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Appalachian basin
Publication:

Chadwick, G.H., 1923, Chemung stratigraphy in western New York: Geological Society of America Bulletin, v. 34, no. 1, p. 68-69.


Summary:

Pg. 69. [In this table Chadwick seems to have restricted Hanover shale, because he gave following as succession in Chautauqua County, western New York (downward): Dunkirk shale; Hanover shale; Pipe Creek shale; hiatus(?) equivalent to Nunda sandstone; and Angola shale; and correlated Hanover and Pipe Creek shales with Wiscoy shale.]

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 896, Silver Creek entry p. 1998).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Hanover shale
  • Modifications:
    • Areal extent
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Appalachian basin
Publication:

Chadwick, G.H., 1924, The stratigraphy of the Chemung group in western New York: New York State Museum Bulletin, no. 251, p. 149-157.


Summary:

Pg. 149. Hanover shale (formerly Silver Creek shale), is highest member of Portage group on Lake Erie. Has been traced continuously into Wiscoy shale of Genesee Valley. [Age is Late Devonian.]

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 896, Silver Creek entry p. 1998).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Hanover shale
  • Modifications:
    • Overview
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Appalachian basin
Publication:

Wilmarth, M.G., 1930, [Selected Geologic Names Committee remarks (ca. 1901-1930) on Paleozoic rocks of the Appalachians], IN Wilmarth, M.G., 1938, Lexicon of geologic names of the United States (including Alaska): U.S. Geological Survey Bulletin, 896, pts. 1-2, 2396 p.


Summary:

Hanover shale. Named from exposures in town of Hanover, Chautauqua Co., western NY. Age is Late Devonian.
See †Silver Creek shale Hartnagel (1912) and Chadwick (1919, 1923, and 1924) entries.

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 896, p. 907).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Hanover shale
  • Modifications:
    • Principal reference
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Appalachian basin
Publication:

Chadwick, G.H., 1933, Great Catskill delta, and revision of late Devonic succession: Pan-American Geologist, v. 60, nos. 2-5., (No. 2, p. 91-107, Sept. 1933; No. 3, areal refinements, p. 189-204, Oct. 1933; No. 4, revised correlations, p. 275-286, Nov. 1933; and No. 5, p. 348-360, Dec. 1933)


Summary:

(No. 2, p. 91-107, Sept. 1933; No. 3, p. 189-204, Oct. 1933; No. 5, p. 348-360, Dec. 1933.) Pg. 96, 98, 193, 198, 199, 357. Hanover shale overlies Pipe Creek shale and underlies Dunkirk shale (Canaseraga sandstone). Traceable from Lake Erie to Genesee River, where, still overlain by the Dunkirk, it becomes main mass of Wiscoy shale. Basal part of Wiscoy = Pipe Creek shale. [Age is Late Devonian.]

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 896, p. 907).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Hanover shale
  • Modifications:
    • Revised
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Appalachian basin
Publication:

Chadwick, G.H., 1935, Chemung is Portage: Geological Society of America Bulletin, v. 46, no. 2, p. 343-354., (February 28, 1935)


Summary:

Pg. 352. Hanover shale. Included this shale in Chemung group. Present in Chautauqua County, western New York. [Age is Late Devonian.]

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 896, p. 907).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Hanover shale
  • Modifications:
    • Revised
    • Areal extent
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Appalachian basin
Publication:

Pepper, J.F., and de Witt, Wallace, Jr., 1950, Stratigraphy of the Upper Devonian Wiscoy sandstone and the equivalent Hanover shale in western and central New York: U.S. Geological Survey Oil and Gas Investigations Chart, OC-37, scale 1:253,440


Summary:

Hanover shale. In western and central New York, includes Pipe Creek shale member at base. Eastward, intertongues with siltstone of Wiscoy sandstone. Underlies Dunkirk shale; overlies Angola shale in west and Nunda sandstone in east. [Age is Late Devonian.]

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 1200, p. 1667).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Hanover shale
  • Modifications:
    • Revised
    • Areal extent
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Appalachian basin
Publication:

Pepper, J.F., and de Witt, Wallace, Jr., 1951, The stratigraphy of the Perrysburg formation of Late Devonian age in western and west-central New York: U.S. Geological Survey Oil and Gas Investigations Chart, OC-45, scale 1:316,800


Summary:

Hanover shale. In area between Dunkirk, Chautauqua County, and Franklin Gulf, Erie County, New York, Hanover shale underlies Dunkirk, member of Perrysburg formation (new). [Age is Late Devonian.]

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 1200, p. 1667).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Hanover shale member
  • Modifications:
    • Revised
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Appalachian basin
Publication:

Tesmer, I.H., 1955, Restudy of Upper Devonian (Chautauquan) stratigraphy and paleontology in southwestern New York State: New York State Museum and Science Service Circular, no. 42, 22 p.


Summary:

Pg. 10 (fig. 1). Hanover shale considered member of Chemung formation. [Age is Late Devonian.]

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 1200, p. 1667).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Hanover shale
  • Modifications:
    • Revised
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Appalachian basin
Publication:

Pepper, J.F., de Witt, Wallace, Jr., and Colton, G.W., 1956, Stratigraphy of the West Falls formation of Late Devonian age in western and west-central New York: U.S. Geological Survey Oil and Gas Investigations Chart, OC-55.


Summary:

Hanover shale. Overlies Angola shale member of West Falls formation (new). [Age is Late Devonian.]

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 1200, p. 1667).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Hanover shale member*
  • Modifications:
    • Revised
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Appalachian basin
Publication:

de Witt, Wallace, Jr., 1960, Java formation of Late Devonian age in western and central New York: American Association of Petroleum Geologists Bulletin, v. 44, no. 12, p. 1933-1936. [Available online, with subscription, from AAPG archives: http://www.aapg.org/datasystems or http://search.datapages.com]


Summary:

Hanover shale member of Java formation. Redefined as member of Java formation (new). Consists largely of medium to medium-greenish-gray slightly calcareous shale and blocky weathering mudrock. East of central Wyoming County, New York, Wiscoy sandstone member of Java separates Hanover member from Dunkirk shale member of Perrysburg. [Age is Late Devonian.]

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 1200, p. 1667).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Hanover Shale Member
  • Modifications:
    • Age modified
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Appalachian basin
Publication:

Baird, G.C., and Lash, G.G., 1990, Devonian strata and paleoenvironments; Chautauqua County region, New York State, IN Lash, G.G., ed., Western New York and Ontario; field trip guidebook: New York State Geological Association Guidebook, 62nd annual meeting, Fredonia, NY, no. 62, p. Sat A1-A46.


Summary:

Hanover Shale Member of Java Formation is uppermost unit in area containing fossils of the Frasnian Stage. Unit is 28 m thick and composed primarily of green-gray mudstone with accessory discrete thin black shale beds and zones of small calcareous, phosphatic and pyritic nodules. Usually very bioturbated, but contains few shelly fossils. The Hanover changes eastward into siltier, upslope deposits of the Wiscoy Member southeast of the type section at Java Village. Fossils include a mixture of benthic and pelagic fossils, goniatites and carbonized driftwood fragments. Small rugose corals and crinoid ossicles also occur. The Frasnian-Famennian stage boundary position has been tentatively placed several meters below the top of this unit by Kirchgasser (pers. comm. 1989).

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Hanover Shale Member*
  • Modifications:
    • Areal extent
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Appalachian basin
Publication:

de Witt, Wallace, Jr., Roen, J.B., and Wallace, L.G., 1993, Stratigraphy of Devonian black shales and associated rocks in the Appalachian basin, IN Roen, J.B., and Kepferle, R.C., eds., Petroleum geology of the Devonian and Mississippian black shale of eastern North America: U.S. Geological Survey Bulletin, 1909-B, p. B1-B57.


Summary:

Hanover Shale Member of the Java Formation extended from southwestern NY into western PA, eastern OH, western WV, eastern KY, and the subsurface of western VA, and northeastern TN.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Hanover Shale Member*
  • Modifications:
    • Biostratigraphic dating
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Appalachian basin
Publication:

Over, D.J., 1997, Conodont biostratigraphy of the Java Formation (Upper Devonian) and the Frasnian-Famennian boundary in western New York State, IN Klapper, Gil, and others, eds., Paleozoic sequence stratigraphy, biostratigraphy, and biogeography; Studies in honor of J. Granville ("Jess") Johnson: Geological Society of America Special Paper, 321, p. 161-177.


Summary:

Pg. 164-166. Hanover Shale Member of Java Formation of West Falls Group. Intensely bioturbated green-gray silty pyritic shale interbedded with argillaceous carbonate beds, calcareous nodules, and organic-rich laminated shales. Underlies Dunkirk Shale of Canadaway Group; contact placed at massive black shale of the Dunkirk. Overlies Pipe Creek Shale Member of Java Formation. Lower part carries conodonts ANCYRODELLA CURVATA (Branson and Mehl) (late form), ANCYROGNATHUS ASYMMETRICUS (Ulrich and Bassler), POLYGNATHUS DECOROSUS Stauffer, and PALMETOLEPIS BOGARTENSIS (Stauffer), the latter defining the base of Montagne Noire (MN) zone 13 of Klapper (1989). Upper part carries conodonts PALMATOLEPIS DELICATULA DELICATULA Branson and Mehl, P. DELICATULA PLATYS Ziegler and Sandberg, P. SUBPERLOBATA Branson and Mehl, and ANCYROGNATHUS sp. A, indicating Middle TRIANGULARIS zone. Age is Late Devonian (latest Frasnian to earliest Famennian; conodont biozones MN 13 to Middle TRIANGULARIS).

Source: Publication.


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Asterisk (*) indicates usage by the U.S. Geological Survey. Other usages by state geological surveys.

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