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Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Coon Mountain bed
  • Modifications:
    • Original reference
  • Dominant lithology:
    • Sandstone
    • Conglomerate
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Bend arch
Publication:

Drake, N.F., 1893, Report on the Colorado coal field of Texas, IN Fourth annual report of the Geological Survey of Texas, 1892: Geological Survey of Texas Annual Report, v. 4, p. 357-444. [Available online from the University of Texas-Austin library: http://www.lib.utexas.edu/books/dumble/]


Summary:

Pg. 387, 417. Coon Mountain bed in Cisco division. Sandstone and conglomerate, 0 to 75 feet thick. Member of Cisco division (Cisco is 2nd from top of 5 Carboniferous divisions of Cummins, 1891). Underlies Stockwether bed and overlies Camp Creek bed. Age is Pennsylvanian.
[Named from Coon Mountain, Brown Co., Colorado River region, central TX.] Best exposures from Coon Mountain southward to Gulf, Colorado and Santa Fe RR, Brown and Coleman Cos., Colorado River region, central TX.

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 896, p. 512); supplemental information from GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Denver GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Coon Mountain bed
  • Modifications:
    • Revised
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Bend arch
Publication:

Plummer, F.B., and Moore, R.C., 1922, Stratigraphy of the Pennsylvanian formations of north-central Texas: University of Texas Bulletin, no. 2132, 237 p.


Summary:

Footnote on p. 172 and charts. Detailed mapping of western part of Brown County has shown that Coon Mountain sandstone bed (No. 11 of Drake's section) is largely Cretaceous sands overlapping several Pennsylvanian beds.
Named from Coon Mountain, Brown Co., Colorado River region, central TX.

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 896, p. 512).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Coon Mountain sandstone
  • Modifications:
    • Overview
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Bend arch
Publication:

Sellards, E.H., 1933, The pre-Paleozoic and Paleozoic systems in Texas, Part 1, IN Sellards, E.H., Adkins, W.S., and Plummer, F.B, The geology of Texas; Volume 1, Stratigraphy: University of Texas Bulletin, no. 3232, p. 15-238., Published July, 1933


Summary:

Pg. 103. Recognized Coon Mountain sandstone of Drake as underlying Stockwether limestone and overlying Camp Creek shale. [Age is Pennsylvanian.]

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 896, p. 512).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Coon Mountain sandstone
  • Modifications:
    • Not used
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Bend arch
Publication:

Bullard, F.M., and Cuyler, R.H., 1935, The Upper Pennsylvanian and Lower Permian section of the Colorado River Valley, Texas, IN Sellards, E.H., chairman, Quarter-Centennial memorial volume of the Division of Natural Resources: University of Texas Bulletin, no. 3501, p. 191-258, (incl. geologic map), See also Pan-Amer. Geol., v. 59, no. 3, p. 233, 1933 [abs.]


Summary:

Ignored Coon Mountain sandstone, and redefined Camp Creek shale member to include all beds in McCulloch County beneath Stockwether limestone and above Saddle Creek shale. [Age is Pennsylvanian.]

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 896, p. 512).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Coon Mountain sandstone member*
  • Modifications:
    • Revised
    • Adopted
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Bend arch
Publication:

Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Coon Mountain sandstone member
  • Modifications:
    • Revised
    • Age modified
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Bend arch
Publication:

Cheney, M.G., 1940, Geology of north-central Texas: American Association of Petroleum Geologists Bulletin, v. 24, no. 1, p. 65-118. [Available online, with subscription, from AAPG archives: http://www.aapg.org/datasystems or http://search.datapages.com]


Summary:

Pg. 66 (fig. 1). Coon Mountain sandstone member of Stockwether formation of Pueblo group. Reallocated to Stockwether, which is here given formational status in Pueblo group (redefined) and assigned to the Permian [Early Permian (Wolfcamp)].

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 1200, p. 927-928).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Coon Mountain sandstone member*
  • Modifications:
    • Areal extent
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Bend arch
Publication:

Eargle, D.H., 1960, Stratigraphy of Pennsylvanian and Lower Permian rocks in Brown and Coleman Counties, Texas, IN Stafford, P.T., and others, Pennsylvanian and Lower Permian rocks of parts of west and central Texas: U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper, 315-D, p. D55-D77. [Available online from the USGS PubsWarehouse: http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/pp/pp315D]


Summary:

Pg. 75, 76. Coon Mountain sandstone member of Pueblo formation. Member of Pueblo formation in report on Brown and Coleman Counties where it is placed above Camp Creek shale member and below Stockwether limestone member. In northern Brown County, extensive channel erosion has removed Saddle Creek limestone member in many places, especially over wide area on Coon Mountain. In places, channel erosion has cut down to within about 50 feet of Chaffin limestone member of Thrifty formation. The sandstone and conglomerate deposited in these channels was called Coon Mountain bed by Drake (1893). Plummer and Moore considered it of Cretaceous age. As the unit was not extensively exposed in area mapped by Moore (1949, USGS Oil and Gas Inv. Prelim. Map 80), he did not use the name. Exact relations of Coon Mountain sandstone member to beds surrounding it are only partially known. The thick body may be a complex of two or more channels, the later one or ones superposed on the earlier in the outcrop area. The member is tentatively placed in the section where Drake placed it until future detailed work explains its relations more exactly. [Age is Early Permian (Wolfcamp).]

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 1200, p. 927-928).


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Asterisk (*) indicates published by U.S. Geological Survey authors.

"No current usage" (†) implies that a name has been abandoned or has fallen into disuse. Former usage and, if known, replacement name given in parentheses ( ).

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