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National Geologic Map Database
Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Buttermilk Falls limestone
  • Modifications:
    • Named
  • Dominant lithology:
    • Limestone
    • Chert
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Appalachian basin
Publication:

Willard, Bradford, 1938, A Paleozoic section at Delaware Water Gap: Pennsylvania Geological Survey General Geology Report, 4th series, no. 11, 35 p.


Summary:

Named the Buttermilk Falls limestone for Buttermilk Falls on Marshall Creek, Monroe Co., PA. Unit replaces what was formerly called Onondaga limestone since the Onondaga was raised to group rank and includes a larger part of the stratigraphic column. Consists of heavily bedded dark- or blue-gray limestone with nodules and lenses of dark chert. Chert more abundant in middle part of unit. Thickness is about 200 ft, but thins westward. Overlies the Esopus shale and underlies the Marcellus formation. The Buttermilk Falls is of Devonian age.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Buttermilk Falls Limestone
  • Modifications:
    • Areal extent
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Appalachian basin
Publication:

Monteverde, D.H., 1992, Bedrock geologic map of the Sussex County, New Jersey, portions of the Culvers Gap and Lake Maskenozha quadrangles: New Jersey Geological Survey Geologic Map, 92-1, scale 1:24,000


Summary:

Buttermilk Falls Limestone extended to Sussex Co., NJ, where it underlies the Marcellus Formation and grades into the underlying Schoharie Formation. Thickness 270 ft. Age is Middle Devonian.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Buttermilk Falls Limestone*
  • Modifications:
    • Age modified
    • Biostratigraphic dating
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Appalachian basin
Publication:

Repetski, J.E., Harris, A.G., and Stamm, N.R., 1995, An overview of conodonts from New Jersey, IN Baker, J.E.B., ed., Contributions to the paleontology of New Jersey: Geological Association of New Jersey Annual Field Conference, 12th annual meeting, Wayne, NJ, October 27-28, 1995, v. 12, p. 191-208.


Summary:

Age of Buttermilk Falls Limestone changed to Early Devonian (Emsian) and Middle Devonian (Eifelian). Buttermilk Falls Limestone in NJ contained no conodonts, but samples from measured sections in type area of Buttermilk Falls near East Stroudsburg, PA, indicate lower one-third of formation is no older than SEROTINUS Zone (Emsian) and remainder of formation formed during PARTITUS and COSTATUS Zones (Eifelian). Also in type area, Tioga Ash Bed occurs 9 m below top of Buttermilk Falls; Tioga is known to lie within COSTATUS Zone at many localities in Appalachian basin.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Buttermilk Falls Limestone*
  • Modifications:
    • Areal extent
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Appalachian basin
Publication:

Drake, A.A., Jr., Volkert, R.A., Monteverde, D.H., Herman, G.C., Houghton, H.F., Parker, R.A., and Dalton, R.F., 1996, Bedrock geologic map of northern New Jersey: U.S. Geological Survey Miscellaneous Investigations Series Map, I-2540-A, scale 1:100,000, Prepared in cooperation with New Jersey Geol. Survey


Summary:

Buttermilk Falls Limestone mapped in northern NJ. Consists of light- to medium-light-gray weathering, medium- to dark-gray, thin- to medium-bedded, clayey silty, fossiliferous, flaggy limestone with nodular black chert. Thickness is approximately 82 m. Conformably overlies the Onondaga Limestone and conformably underlies the Marcellus Shale. The Buttermilk Falls is of Middle Devonian age.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


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For more information, please contact Nancy Stamm, Geologic Names Committee Secretary.

Asterisk (*) indicates usage by the U.S. Geological Survey. Other usages by state geological surveys.

"No current usage" (†) implies that a name has been abandoned or has fallen into disuse. Former usage and, if known, replacement name given in parentheses ( ).

Slash (/) indicates name does not conform with nomenclatural guidelines (CSN, 1933; ACSN, 1961, 1970; NACSN, 1983, 2005). This may be explained within brackets ([ ]).