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Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Battery Rock conglomerate
  • Modifications:
    • Incidental mention
  • Dominant lithology:
    • Conglomerate
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Illinois basin
Publication:

Owen, D.D., 1856, Report of the Geological Survey in Kentucky made during the years 1854 and 1855: Kentucky Geological Survey, v. 1, p. 3-248.


Summary:

Pg. 49. Incidental mention as Battery Rock conglomerate.

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 1200, p. 237-238).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Battery Rock formation
  • Modifications:
    • Principal reference
  • Dominant lithology:
    • Sandstone
    • Shale
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Illinois basin
Publication:

Weller, J.M., 1940, Geology and oil possibilities of extreme southern Illinois, Union, Johnson, Pope, Hardin, Alexander, Pulaski, and Massac Counties: Illinois Geological Survey Report of Investigations, no. 71, 71 p.


Summary:

Pg. 36, 37-38. Battery Rock formation of Caseyville group. Has maximum thickness of more than 200 feet and consists of two nearly equal parts: Battery Rock sandstone below and Drury shale member above. The sandstone is medium- to coarse-grained, cross-bedded, and massive; it ranges from less than 50 to more than 100 feet in thickness. Transition from sandstone to Drury shale member is locally abrupt, but elsewhere thin-bedded and shaly sandstone beds make determination of sharp boundary impossible; thin beds of massive sandstone also are locally present above Battery Rock member so that, where exposures are discontinuous, its upper limit is difficult to determine. Underlies Pounds formation (new); probably unconformable but actual contact rarely exposed. Unconformably overlies Lusk formation (new) except in parts of northwestern Union County, Illinois, where it overlaps Chester strata. Relations to Lick Creek sandstone at Cedar Bluff not entirely clear, and use of this name for widespread sandstone at base of Battery Rock is questionable. Age is Early Pennsylvanian.
Type locality: along Ohio River bluff, in sec. 26, T. 11 S., R. 10 E., Shawneetown quadrangle, Hardin Co., IL. [Named from Battery Rock in sec. 21, T. 11 S., R. 10 E.]

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 1200, p. 237-238).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Battery Rock sandstone
  • Modifications:
    • Revised
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Illinois basin
Publication:

Wanless, H.R., 1946, Pennsylvanian geology of a part of the southern Appalachian coal field: Geological Society of America Memoir, 13, 162 p.


Summary:

Pg. 136. Lick Creek sandstone now considered to be Battery Rock.
[Misprint (US geologic names lexicon, USGS Bull. 1200, p. 238): Publication date should be 1946, not 1944.]

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 1200, p. 237-238).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Battery Rock sandstone member
  • Modifications:
    • Revised
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Illinois basin
Publication:

Kosanke, R.M., Simon, J.A., Wanless, H.R., and Willman, H.B., 1960, Classification of the Pennsylvanian strata of Illinois: Illinois Geological Survey Report of Investigations, no. 214, 84 p.


Summary:

Pg. 29, 30, 44 (table 1), 61, pl. 1. Battery Rock sandstone member of Caseyville formation of McCormick group (new). In southeastern Illinois, occurs above Lusk shale member and below Sellers limestone member; in southwestern Illinois, occurs above Wayside sandstone member and below the Drury shale member. Thickness 98 feet in type section of Caseyville. Age is Early Pennsylvanian. Report presents new rock-stratigraphic classification of Pennsylvanian strata in Illinois. Cyclical classification retained but is entirely independent of rock-stratigraphic classification.

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 1200, p. 237-238).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Battery Rock Sandstone Member*
  • Modifications:
    • Adopted
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Illinois basin
Publication:

Amos, D.H., 1965, Geology of parts of the Shetlerville and Rosiclare quadrangles, Kentucky: U.S. Geological Survey Geologic Quadrangle Map, GQ-400, scale 1:24,000 [http://ngmdb.usgs.gov/Prodesc/proddesc_867.htm]


Summary:

Battery Rock Sandstone Member of Caseyville Formation accepted for USGS use in Kentucky.
[Mapped in Livingston Co., western KY, in areas along Ohio River.]

Source: Modified from GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Battery Rock Sandstone Member
  • Modifications:
    • Overview
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Illinois basin
Publication:

Willman, H.B., Atherton, Elwood, Buschbach, T.C., Collinson, Charles, Frye, J.C., Hopkins, M.E., Lineback, J.A., and Simon, J.A., 1975, Handbook of Illinois stratigraphy: Illinois Geological Survey Bulletin, no. 95, 261 p.


Summary:

Pg. 179, 181. Battery Rock Sandstone Member of the Caseyville Formation (Cox, 1875, p. 204) is named for Battery Rock, a bluff of massive sandstone on the west bank of the Ohio River in Hardin County, the type section (sec. 26, T. 11 S., R. 10 E.). The Battery Rock Sandstone, a prominent bluff-forming unit, is very well developed in Gallatin, Hardin, and Pope Counties, where it is 50 to 100 feet thick in a large area. It is also as much as 100 feet thick in the western part of the southern Illinois outcrop belt, but there it is more lenticular. Along the southwestern side of the Illinois basin, the sandstone extends only as far north as Randolph County. In the subsurface to the north and northeast of the outcrop belt, the Battery Rock is difficult to trace because several other thick sandstone units occur in the lower part of the McCormick Group. The Battery Rock is generally medium-grained sandstone, but at places it becomes coarse; almost everywhere it contains scattered quartz granules and pebbles, which in places form conglomerate beds. Although the Caseyville sandstone have been called conglomerates, the term “conglomeritic” is more appropriate. The Battery Rock is correlated with the lower Caseyville conglomerate, or Kyrock Sandstone Member, of western Kentucky and with the lower part of the Mansfield Sandstone of Indiana.
See also E.T. Cox, 1875, Geol. Gallatin Co., Chap. 17, IN A.H. Worthen and others, Geol. and Paleo., Illinois Geol. Survey, v. 6, pt. 1, p. 197-219; available online from the Univ. Chicago Library: http://worthen.lib.uchicago.edu/ (accessed July 1, 2010).

Source: Publication.


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Battery Rock Sandstone Member
  • Modifications:
    • Mapped
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Illinois basin
Publication:

Nelson, W.J., Devera, J.A., and Jacobson, R.J., 1991, Stratigraphy of the bedrock [includes abstract and introduction], IN Nelson, W.J., and others, Geology of the Eddyville, Stonefort, and Creal Springs quadrangles, southern Illinois: Illinois Geological Survey Bulletin, no. 96, p. 1-43, (incl. geologic maps, scale 1:24,000), Accompanied by the Creal Springs (IGQ-4), Eddyville (IGQ-5), and Stonefort (IGQ-6) Illinois Geol. Survey Geol. Quad. Ser. maps, scale 1:24,000. Available online.


Summary:

Pg. 13 (fig. 6), 18-20, pl. 1. Battery Rock Sandstone Member of Caseyville Formation. Present in Stonefort, Eddyville, and Waltersburg 7.5-min quadrangles, Johnson and Pope Counties, Illinois. Nearly white, light- to medium-gray weathering, thick-bedded to massive, conglomeratic, quartzose sandstone. Almost all outcrops contain abundant quartz pebbles 0.25 to 1 inch diameter. Lenses of quartz-pebble conglomerate common. Large-scale and planar and trough cross-bedding common. Thickness 30 to 60 feet in most places; probably ranges to 100 feet. Underlies Drury Member of Caseyville; contact abrupt in most places. Overlies Wayside Member of Caseyville; contact sharp and appears erosional. Age is Early Pennsylvanian (Morrowan), based on fossils.
Mapped in Stonefort quadrangle (http://ngmdb.usgs.gov/Prodesc/proddesc_10341.htm) and Eddyville quadrangle (http://ngmdb.usgs.gov/Prodesc/proddesc_10314.htm).

Source: Publication.


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Battery Rock
  • Modifications:
    • Overview
  • Dominant lithology:
    • Sandstone
    • Shale
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Illinois basin
Publication:

Tri-State Committee on Correlation of the Pennsylvanian System in the Illinois Basin, 2001, Toward a more uniform stratigraphic nomenclature for rock units (formations and groups) of the Pennsylvanian System in the Illinois basin: Illinois Basin Consortium Study, no. 5, 26 p., Joint publication of the Illinois, Indiana, and Kentucky geol. surveys


Summary:

Pg. 4-6, pl. Caseyville Formation of Raccoon Creek Group. Recognized in Illinois and Kentucky. Includes Pounds Sandstone Member at top. Lithology varies; can be entirely quart pebble-bearing sandstones, mixed sandstones and shales, or thick shaly sequences. Thickness up to 600+ feet; varies greatly because of uneven topography on which it was deposited. Underlies Tradewater Formation of Raccoon Creek Group; unconformably overlies Ordovician to Mississippian rocks. Age is Morrowan.
This is classification agreed upon by state geological surveys of Illinois and Kentucky. Equivalent rocks in Indiana called Mansfield Formation of Raccoon Creek Group.

Source: Publication.


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