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National Geologic Map Database
Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Windy Pass Argillite Member*
  • Modifications:
    • Named
  • Dominant lithology:
    • Mudstone
    • Claystone
    • Siltstone
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Snake River basin
Publication:

Oriel, S.S., Armstrong, F.C., Fritz, W.H., and Palmer, A.R., 1971, Uppermost Precambrian and lowest Cambrian rocks in southeastern Idaho, with contributions to early Middle Cambrian faunal zones: U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper, 394, 52 p. [Available online from the USGS PubsWarehouse: http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/pp/pp394]


Summary:

Named for exposures at and near Windy Pass in southwestern part sec. 12, T. 10 S., R. 38 E., Bannock Co, ID on Snake River basin. Type area is a belt of gentle slopes west of crest of Portneuf Range, from a point west of Twin Knobs in central part, sec. 12, T. 10 S., R. 38 E. south-southeastward to a point south of Sedgwick Peak, near middle of sec. 32, T. 10 S., R. 39 E. Type section in middle of sec. 12, T. 10 S., R. 38 E., on a spur extending southwest from Twin Knobs. Consists dominantly of metamorphosed thinly bedded to thinly laminated mudstone, claystone, and siltstone interbedded with quartzite in lenses and beds up to 30 ft thick. Is 762 ft thick where measured west of Twin Knobs. Lower contact placed at top of uppermost thick quartzite beds of Kasiska Quartzite Member (new) and at base of dominantly argillaceous sequence with quartzite units only a few ft thick of the Windy Pass. Upper contact is gradational with Sedgwick Peak Quartzite Member (new), a return to quartzite as the dominant lithology. Contains no diagnostic fossils. Assigned a Precambrian(?) age. Geologic map.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Denver GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Windy Pass Argillite Member*
  • Modifications:
    • Age modified
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Snake River basin
    • Northern Rocky Mountain region
Publication:

Platt, L.B., 1985, Geologic map of the Hawkins quadrangle, Bannock County, Idaho: U.S. Geological Survey Miscellaneous Field Studies Map, MF-1812, scale 1:24,000


Summary:

Windy Pass Argillite Member of Brigham Quartzite initially assigned a Precambrian(?) age, but it has since been observed to contain tracks and worm tubes of probable Early Cambrian age. [Not clear if author considers unit Precambrian(?) and Early Cambrian(?) age or only Early Cambrian(?) age.] Report area lies in the Snake River basin [Precambrian Northern Rocky Mountain region]; name Windy Pass used in correlation with part of Gibson Jack Formation. Windy Pass not mapped.

Source: Modified from GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Denver GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Windy Pass Argillite
  • Modifications:
    • Revised
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Snake River basin
    • Wasatch uplift
Publication:

Link, P.K., and Jansen, S.T., 1987, Stratigraphy of Brigham Group (Late Proterozoic-Cambrian), Bannock, Portneuf, and Bear River Ranges, southeastern Idaho, IN Miller, W.R., ed., The thrust belt revisited: Wyoming Geological Association Field Conference Guidebook, 38th Annual Field Conference, Jackson Hole, WY, September 8-11, 1987, no. 38, p. 133-147.


Summary:

Raised to formation rank and assigned to Brigham Group (raised rank) as one of 7 formations in the southern Portneuf and Bear River Ranges, Bannock Co on the Snake River basin, and Bear Lake Co on the Wasatch uplift. Overlies Camelback Mountain Quartzite and underlies Sedgwick Peak Quartzite, both formations of the Brigham. Basal contact placed at base of "first thick argillite." Upper contact placed at base of "first quartzite." Is thickest (761 ft) at its type. Is 330 ft thick in southern Bear River Range. Is the offshore mud deposit assigned to depositional sequence 4. Cambrian age. Cross section.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Denver GNULEX).


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For more information, please contact Nancy Stamm, Geologic Names Committee Secretary.

Asterisk (*) indicates published by U.S. Geological Survey authors.

"No current usage" (†) implies that a name has been abandoned or has fallen into disuse. Former usage and, if known, replacement name given in parentheses ( ).

Slash (/) indicates name does not conform with nomenclatural guidelines (CSN, 1933; ACSN, 1961, 1970; NACSN, 1983, 2005). This may be explained within brackets ([ ]).