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Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Perryville formation
  • Modifications:
    • First used
  • Dominant lithology:
    • Limestone
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Cincinnati arch
Publication:

Nickles, J.M., 1905, The Upper Ordovician rocks of Kentucky and their Bryozoa: Kentucky Geological Survey Bulletin, no. 5, 64 p.


Summary:

First use as Perryville Formation of Lexington Group. Name apparently first published in this paper. Shown in table only, not discussed in text.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Perryville bed
  • Modifications:
    • Revised
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Cincinnati arch
Publication:

Foerste, A.F., 1909, Preliminary notes on Cincinnatian and Lexington fossils: Denison University, Bulletin of the Scientific Laboratories, v. 14, p. 289-324.


Summary:

Name changed slightly to Perryville bed of Lexington Limestone.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Perryville limestone*
  • Modifications:
    • Overview
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Cincinnati arch
Publication:

Hamilton, D.K., 1948, Some solutional features of the limestone near Lexington, Kentucky: Economic Geology, v. 43, no. 1, p. 39-52.


Summary:

Used as Perryville limestone.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Perryville Limestone Member*
  • Modifications:
    • Revised
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Cincinnati arch
Publication:

Cressman, E.R., and Hrabar, S.V., 1970, Geologic map of the Wilmore quadrangle, central Kentucky: U.S. Geological Survey Geologic Quadrangle Map, GQ-847, scale 1:24,000 [http://ngmdb.usgs.gov/Prodesc/proddesc_2149.htm]


Summary:

Perryville Limestone Member of Lexington Limestone adopted by the USGS. Consists of medium-gray, light-gray-weathering, cryptograined, conchoidally fracturing limestone. Contains some interbeds of very fine grained bioclastic limestone and irregularly bedded brachiopodal limestone. Underlain by Tanglewood Limestone Member and overlain by Sulphur Well Member, both of Lexington Limestone.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Perryville Member*
  • Modifications:
    • Overview
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Cincinnati arch
Publication:

Cressman, E.R., 1973, Lithostratigraphy and depositional environments of the Lexington Limestone (Ordovician) of central Kentucky: U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper, 768, 61 p.


Summary:

Contains comprehensive general description of Perryville Member including lithology, paleontology, areal distribution, environment of deposition, and stratigraphic setting. Perryville Member is divided into the Faulconer, Salvisa, and Cornishville Beds, ascending. Faulconer is composed of brownish-gray somewhat fossiliferous calcilutite in rough surfaced beds; Salvisa is composed of very light gray calcilutite interbedded with brownish-gray calcilutite in even beds from several inches to about 1 ft thick; Cornishville is nodular-bedded fossiliferous limestone. Thickness of Perryville ranges from 0 to over 50 ft. Underlain by Tanglewood Member and overlain by Brannon Member of Lexington Limestone.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Perryville Member*
  • Modifications:
    • Overview
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Cincinnati arch
Publication:

Weir, G.W., and Cressman, E.R., 1978, Geologic names of Ordovician rock-stratigraphic units exposed in Kentucky: U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report, OF-78-796, 254 p.


Summary:

Contains comprehensive general description of Perryville Member. Includes information about history of name, lithology, thickness, areal distribution, and stratigraphic setting.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Perryville Limestone Member*
  • Modifications:
    • Overview
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Cincinnati arch
Publication:

Wahlman, G.P., 1992, Middle and Upper Ordovician symmetrical univalved mollusks (Monoplacophora and Bellerophontina) of the Cincinnati arch region, IN Pojeta, John, Jr., ed., Contributions to the Ordovician paleontology of Kentucky and nearby states: U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper, 1066-O, p. O1-O203.


Summary:

The Perryville Limestone Member of the Lexington Limestone is divided into three units (ascending): (1) the Faulconer Bed consists of 40 feet of brownish-gray, fossiliferous, micritic limestone with ostracodes, pelecypods, gastropods, brachiopods, bryozoans, crinoids, corals, and stromatoporoids, (2) the Salvisa Bed consists of 10 to 15 feet of interbedded light-gray to light-olive-gray micritic limestone and brownish-gray micritic limestone that contains a sparse fauna of ostracodes, gastropods, and pelecypods, and (3) the Cornishville Bed consists of 2 to 10 feet of nodular bedded calcisiltite and fine-grained calcarenite with abundant brachiopods and bryozoans. The Perryville only occurs in the southern outcrop area. Overlies and intertongues with the Tanglewood Limestone Member of the Lexington and underlies the Brannon Member of the Lexington. The Faulconer Bed is interpreted to be deposited in shallow, quiet water of normal salinity, the Salvisa Bed in quiet hypersaline water, and the Cornishville Bed in shallow, moderately agitated water with normal salinity.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Perryville Limestone Member*
  • Modifications:
    • Age modified
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Cincinnati arch

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