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Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Greenbrier Formation
  • Modifications:
    • Revised
    • Overview
  • Dominant lithology:
    • Limestone
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Appalachian basin
Publication:

Brezinski, D.K., 1989, The Mississippian System in Maryland: Maryland Geological Survey Report of Investigations, no. 52, 75 p.


Summary:

Author retains name Greenbrier because it is entrenched in the literature, but Greenbrier of MD is similar to WV Greenbrier Group only in that it is a marine carbonate. Unit thins northward from its type area where it is 1800 ft to 250 to 125 ft in western MD. Greenbrier is here revised in western MD to include (ascending) Loyalhanna, Deer Valley, Savage Dam (new name), and Wymps Gap Members.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Greenbrier Limestone
  • Modifications:
    • Overview
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Appalachian basin

Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Greenbrier Limestone*
  • Modifications:
    • Biostratigraphic dating
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Appalachian basin
Publication:

Harris, A.G., Stamm, N.R., Weary, D.J., Repetski, J.E., Stamm, R.G., and Parker, R.A., 1994, Conodont color alteration index (CAI) map and conodont-based age determinations for the Winchester 30' x 60' quadrangle and adjacent area, Virginia, West Virginia, and Maryland: U.S. Geological Survey Miscellaneous Field Studies Map, MF-2239, 1 sheet, 40 p., scale 1:100,000 [http://ngmdb.usgs.gov/Prodesc/proddesc_294.htm]


Summary:

Conodont biostratigraphy indicates that the Greenbrier Limestone is of Late Mississippian (Chesterian) age. Conodonts indicative of Chesterian faunas were recovered from the Loyalhanna Limestone Member and the Wymps Gap Member.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Greenbrier Limestone
  • Modifications:
    • Overview
    • Areal extent
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Appalachian basin
Publication:

Nolde, J.E., 1994, Devonian to Pennsylvanian stratigraphy and coal beds of the Appalachian plateaus province, IN Geology and mineral resources of the southwest Virginia coalfield: Virginia Division of Mineral Resources Publication, no. 131, p. 1-85.


Summary:

In report area, Greenbrier Limestone crops out from Cumberland Gap northeastward along the northwest flank of the Powell Valley anticline to Little Stone Gap where the formation curves around the nose of the anticline. In outcrop reaches a maximum thickness of 850 ft in Tazewell and Russell Cos. and in the subsurface thins northwestward to about 200 ft near the Buchanan Co., VA, and Pike Co., KY, border. Consists of a thick sequence of dark-gray to brownish-gray to very light gray, micritic to sparry, highly fossiliferous oolitic, locally cherty limestone with interbedded shale, siltstone, and argillaceous limestone. Lower 40 ft contains black, gray, and pale-red chert nodules. A pale-brown dolomite occurs near the top of the chert-bearing zone. Bedding is thick near the base and thin near the top. Unit is divided into the (ascending) Little Valley Limestone Member, the St. Louis Limestone Member (Hillsdale Member of Reger, 1926), the "St. Genevieve" Limestone Member, and the Gasper Limestone Member. [Subdivisions are discussed in text but are not shown in figures.] Disconformably overlies the Maccrady Shale or the Price Formation and gradationally underlies the Bluefield Formation. Age is Late Mississippian (Meramecian and Chesterian).

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


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For more information, please contact Nancy Stamm, Geologic Names Committee Secretary.

Asterisk (*) indicates usage by the U.S. Geological Survey. Other usages by state geological surveys.

"No current usage" (†) implies that a name has been abandoned or has fallen into disuse. Former usage and, if known, replacement name given in parentheses ( ).

Slash (/) indicates name does not conform with nomenclatural guidelines (CSN, 1933; ACSN, 1961, 1970; NACSN, 1983, 2005). This may be explained within brackets ([ ]).