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National Geologic Map Database
Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Whitesburg limestone*
  • Modifications:
    • First used
  • Dominant lithology:
    • Limestone
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Appalachian basin
Publication:

Ulrich, E.O., 1924, Classified and correlated lower Paleozoic formations in east and central Tennessee, IN Gordon, C.H., Marble deposits of east Tennessee; Part 1, History, occurrence and distribution: Tennessee Division of Geology Bulletin, no. 28, p. 34.


Summary:

The name Whitesburg limestone appears in a table as unconformably overlying the Lenoir limestone or Holston marble and underlying the Athens shale. Unit 50 to 600 feet thick.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Whitesburg limestone*
  • Modifications:
    • Named
  • Dominant lithology:
    • Limestone
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Appalachian basin
Publication:

Ulrich, E.O., 1930, Ordovician trilobites of the family Telephidae and concerned stratigraphic correlations; Article 21: U.S. National Museum Proceedings, v. 76, 101 p.


Summary:

Named the Whitesburg limestone for Whitesburg, Hamblen Co., TN. Consists of dark crystalline limestone that at many places in the Appalachian Valley south of Staunton, VA, underlies the dark calcareous shale or limestone of the Athens shale. In most places it rests on the Lenoir limestone but may also overly the Holston marble. Unit is about 500 feet thick. The Whitesburg is of Early Ordovician age (Chazyan). [Chazyan was later changed to Middle Ordovician, hence the Whitesburg is of Middle Ordovician age]

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Whitesburg limestone member*
  • Modifications:
    • Revised
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Appalachian basin
Publication:

Neuman, R.B., 1955, Middle Ordovician rocks of the type Tellico-Sevier belt, eastern Tennessee, IN Shorter contributions to general geology, 1955-57: U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper, 274-F, p. F141-F178. [Available online from the USGS PubsWarehouse: http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/pp/pp274F]


Summary:

Revised the Whitesburg to the Whitesburg limestone member of the Blockhouse shale in TN. The Whitesburg is the basal member of the Blockhouse and overlies the Lenoir limestone. Thickness of the Whitesburg at the Blockhouse type locality is 5 to 20 feet. Unit is of Middle Ordovician age.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Whitesburg Formation*
  • Modifications:
    • Revised
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Appalachian basin
Publication:

Walker, K.R., Steinhauff, D.M., and Roberson, K.E., 1992, Uppermost Knox Group, the Knox unconformity, the Middle Ordovician transition from shallow shelf to deeper basin at Dandridge, Tennessee, IN Driese, S.G., and others, eds., Paleosols, paleoweathering surfaces, and sequence boundaries: University of Tennessee, Department of Geological Sciences Studies in Geology, no. 21, p. 13-18.


Summary:

Fetzer Member or facies is assigned to the base of the Whitesburg Formation and overlies the Lenoir Formation in this report. Member consists of a basal metalliferous carbonate and an overlying limonitic/phosphatic claystone. Unit is a dark brown to dark gray, to nearly black, well indurated, argillaceous carbonate with abundant fossils. Bedding is generally nodular to laminated. The Fetzer proper is at least 5 m thick in the eastern outcrop. On the western end of the outcrop, it is about 2 m thick and overlies a more shaly tongue of the Whitesburg. Authors believe that the Fetzer is not a continuous body of rock but instead consists of lenses.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


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For more information, please contact Nancy Stamm, Geologic Names Committee Secretary.

Asterisk (*) indicates usage by the U.S. Geological Survey. Other usages by state geological surveys.

"No current usage" (†) implies that a name has been abandoned or has fallen into disuse. Former usage and, if known, replacement name given in parentheses ( ).

Slash (/) indicates name does not conform with nomenclatural guidelines (CSN, 1933; ACSN, 1961, 1970; NACSN, 1983, 2005). This may be explained within brackets ([ ]).