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National Geologic Map Database
Geologic Unit: Topache
Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Topache limestone*
  • Modifications:
    • Named
  • Dominant lithology:
    • Limestone
    • Shale
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Great Basin province
Publication:

Butler, B.S., 1913, Geology and ore deposits of the San Francisco and adjacent districts, Utah: U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper, 80, 212 p., (incl. geologic map, scale 1:62,500)


Summary:

Named for Topache Peak, T28S, R11W, Beaver Co, UT in the Great Basin province. No type locality designated. Covers an area of about 2 1/2 sq mi in southeast part of map area. Also mapped in Beaver Mountains and north of West Spring in northeast part of map area. Geologic map. Conformably overlies Mowitza shale (new) of Devonian age. Conformably underlies Talisman quartzite (new) of Pennsylvanian? age. Divided into lower beds of heavy-bedded blue dolomitic limestone and some shaly limestone, siliceous and cherty beds, and upper blue limestone and a few shaly beds. About 1,500 ft thick. Fossils (listed) include brachiopods, crinoids, corals. Assigned to the Mississippian.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Denver GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Topache Limestone
  • Modifications:
    • Not used
Publication:

Baer, J.L., 1962, Geology of the Star Range, Beaver County, Utah: Brigham Young University Geology Studies, v. 9, pt. 2, p. 29-52.


Summary:

Not used in this report. Rocks assigned by Butler (1913) to Topache Limestone in this area are reassigned to the Redwall Limestone (formerly the lower part of the Topache) and to the Callville Limestone (formerly the upper part of the Topache).

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Denver GNULEX).


For more information, please contact Nancy Stamm, Geologic Names Committee Secretary.

Asterisk (*) indicates published by U.S. Geological Survey authors.

"No current usage" (†) implies that a name has been abandoned or has fallen into disuse. Former usage and, if known, replacement name given in parentheses ( ).

Slash (/) indicates name does not conform with nomenclatural guidelines (CSN, 1933; ACSN, 1961, 1970; NACSN, 1983, 2005). This may be explained within brackets ([ ]).