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National Geologic Map Database
Geologic Unit: Scherr
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Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Scherr Formation
  • Modifications:
    • Named
  • Dominant lithology:
    • Siltstone
    • Sandstone
    • Shale
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Appalachian basin
Publication:

Dennison, J.M., 1970, Stratigraphic divisions of Upper Devonian Greenland Gap Group ("Chemung Formation") along Allegheny Front in West Virginia, Maryland, and Highland County, Virginia: Southeastern Geology, v. 12, no. 1, p. 53-82.


Summary:

Unit is here named for village of Scherr in Grant Co., WV, and assigned to the newly named Greenland Gap Group, which replaces the name Chemung Formation in report area. Scherr Formation consists predominantly of siltstone and shale. Lower part of unit includes considerable fine-grained sandstone, while upper two thirds contains almost no sandstone. Weathers light olive gray. Unit measures 1004 ft (200 m) at type. Eastward, unit becomes unrecognizable at VA border and consequently is restricted to WV border at this time. Disconformably underlies newly named Foreknobs Formation (Greenland Gap Group); overlies Brallier Formation. Age is Late Devonian.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Scherr Formation*
  • Modifications:
    • Areal extent
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Appalachian basin
Publication:

de Witt, Wallace, Jr., 1974, Geologic map of the Beans Cove and Hyndman quadrangles and part of the Fairhope quadrangle, Bedford County, Pennsylvania: U.S. Geological Survey Miscellaneous Investigations Series Map, I-801, 1 sheet, 6 p., scale 1:24,000


Summary:

Scherr and Foreknobs Formations of Dennison (1970) here geographically extended into south-central PA and adopted for use by the USGS in the report area and in their type locality state of WV. Greenland Gap Group not used in this report.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Scherr Formation
  • Modifications:
    • Areal extent
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Appalachian basin
Publication:

Boswell, R.M., Donaldson, A.C., and Lewis, J.S., 1987, Subsurface stratigraphy of the Upper Devonian and Lower Mississippian of northern West Virginia: Southeastern Geology, v. 28, no. 2, p. 105-131.


Summary:

Scherr and Foreknobs Formations are not recognized in the subsurface of WV, west of the Allegheny Front; therefore, Greenland Gap is reduced to formation rank in that area where it replaces use of the term "Chemung." Uppermost members of the Foreknobs are retained as members of the Greenland Gap Formation.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Scherr Formation
  • Modifications:
    • Areal extent
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Appalachian basin
Publication:

Dennison, J.M., Filer, J.K., and Rossbach, T.J., 1994, Upper Devonian outcrop stratigraphy along the Appalachian basin margin in southeastern West Virginia and southwestern Virginia and implications for hydrocarbon exploration, IN Schultz, A.P., and Rader, E.K., eds., Studies in eastern energy and the environment: Virginia Division of Mineral Resources Publication, no. 132, p. 43-49., See also 1994 AAPG Eastern Section Spec. Vol. (Williamsburg, VA, Sept. 19-21, 1993)


Summary:

Arbitrary stratigraphic cutoffs are drawn where formational diagnostic characteristics are lost by facies change. The Scherr Formation ends at the WV-VA boundary because it becomes finer grained and the last sandstone disappears. It passes laterally into the Brallier Formation. Although the Minnehaha Springs Member turbidite bundle loses its sand southwestward, a siltstone bundle can still be indentified as the Minnehaha Springs within the Brallier Formation as far southwest as White Sulphur Springs.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


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For more information, please contact Nancy Stamm, Geologic Names Committee Secretary.

Asterisk (*) indicates usage by the U.S. Geological Survey. Other usages by state geological surveys.

"No current usage" (†) implies that a name has been abandoned or has fallen into disuse. Former usage and, if known, replacement name given in parentheses ( ).

Slash (/) indicates name does not conform with nomenclatural guidelines (CSN, 1933; ACSN, 1961, 1970; NACSN, 1983, 2005). This may be explained within brackets ([ ]).