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National Geologic Map Database
Geologic Unit: Purcell
Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Purcell Limestone Member
  • Modifications:
    • Named
  • Dominant lithology:
    • Limestone
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Appalachian basin
Publication:

Cate, A.S., 1963, Lithostratigraphy of some Middle and Upper Devonian rocks in the subsurface of southwestern Pennsylvania, IN Shepps, V.C., ed., Symposium on Middle and Upper Devonian stratigraphy of Pennsylvania and adjacent states: Pennsylvania Geological Survey General Geology Report, 4th series, no. 39, p. 229-240.


Summary:

Named the Purcell Limestone Member of the Marcellus Formation in PA, MD, VA, and WV for the Purcell gas field, Bedford Co., PA. Consists of 30 meters of limestone that "contains nodules resembling golf balls." The Purcell is of Middle Devonian age.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Purcell Limestone Member*
  • Modifications:
    • Areal extent
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Appalachian basin
Publication:

de Witt, Wallace, Jr., Roen, J.B., and Wallace, L.G., 1993, Stratigraphy of Devonian black shales and associated rocks in the Appalachian basin, IN Roen, J.B., and Kepferle, R.C., eds., Petroleum geology of the Devonian and Mississippian black shale of eastern North America: U.S. Geological Survey Bulletin, 1909-B, p. B1-B57.


Summary:

Purcell Limestone Member of the Marcellus Shale in central PA is composed of a gray silty shale and mudrock, as well as some beds of siltstone, many limestone nodules, and a few barite nodules approximately 1 to 2 in. in diameter. Author states that unit extends into the subsurface of PA, MD, and WV. In addition, Fig. 8 shows the Purcell extending northward into south-central NY. Eastern limit of the unit is not mapped.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Purcell Member*
  • Modifications:
    • Biostratigraphic dating
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Appalachian basin
Publication:

Harris, A.G., Stamm, N.R., Weary, D.J., Repetski, J.E., Stamm, R.G., and Parker, R.A., 1994, Conodont color alteration index (CAI) map and conodont-based age determinations for the Winchester 30' x 60' quadrangle and adjacent area, Virginia, West Virginia, and Maryland: U.S. Geological Survey Miscellaneous Field Studies Map, MF-2239, 1 sheet, 40 p., scale 1:100,000 [http://ngmdb.usgs.gov/Prodesc/proddesc_294.htm]


Summary:

Conodont biostratigraphy indicates that the Purcell Member of the Marcellus Shale in the Winchester 30 X 60 minute quadrangle is of Middle Devonian (Eifelian) age. Conodonts indicative of the PO. C. COSTATUS Zone were recovered from this unit.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Purcell Member
  • Modifications:
    • Areal extent
    • Overview
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Appalachian basin
Publication:

Rossbach, T.J., and Dennison, J.M., 1994, Devonian strata of Catawba syncline, near Salem, Virginia, IN Schultz, Art, and Henika, Bill, Fieldguides to Southern Appalachian structure, stratigraphy, and engineering geology: Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Department of Geological Sciences Guidebook, Geological Society of America, Southeastern Section, annual meeting, Blacksburg, VA, April 7-9, 1994, no. 10, p. 95-126.


Summary:

Within the Millboro Shale in the study area are 64 ft of limestones and calcitic shales that compose the Purcell Member. Though previously described in this area, the strata until now have not been given a name. The Purcell here also contains barite nodules. The shale and limestone can be traced from near Salem northward into central PA and from there, in the subsurface, to the type Cherry Valley Limestone outcrop within the Marcellus Shale of NY.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


For more information, please contact Nancy Stamm, Geologic Names Committee Secretary.

Asterisk (*) indicates usage by the U.S. Geological Survey. Other usages by state geological surveys.

"No current usage" (†) implies that a name has been abandoned or has fallen into disuse. Former usage and, if known, replacement name given in parentheses ( ).

Slash (/) indicates name does not conform with nomenclatural guidelines (CSN, 1933; ACSN, 1961, 1970; NACSN, 1983, 2005). This may be explained within brackets ([ ]).