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National Geologic Map Database
Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Pittsford shale
  • Modifications:
    • Named
  • Dominant lithology:
    • Shale
    • Dolomite
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Appalachian basin
Publication:

Clarke, J.M., 1903, Report of the State Paleontologist, 1902: New York State Museum Bulletin, no. 69, p. 851-891.


Summary:

Distinctive layer of black shales at base of Salina shales exposed by excavations in Erie Canal near Pittsford, Monroe County, here named Pittsford shale. Contains unique collection of heretofore unknown fossils. Consists black shale and interbedded platten dolomite with profusion of eurypterids. Underlies Vernon shale; overlies Guelph Dolomite. [See also Clarke (1903, New York State Museum Handbook 19) and Sarle (1903, New York State Museum Bull. 69).]

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Pittsford Bed
  • Modifications:
    • Revised
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Appalachian basin
Publication:

Ciurca, S.J., Jr., 1990, Eurypterid biofacies of the Silurian-Devonian evaporite sequence; Niagara Peninsula, Ontario, Canada, and New York, IN Lash, G.G., ed., Western New York and Ontario; field trip guidebook: New York State Geological Association Guidebook, 62nd annual meeting, Fredonia, NY, no. 62, p. Sat/Sun D1-D30.


Summary:

Author disagrees with Fisher (1957, 1960) and Rickard (1975), who recommended abandonment of the Pittsford Shale. He states that even though unit is of limited extent, it contains an exceptional eurypterid-bearing interval and is therefore a valid unit. He proposes that the unit be revised Pittsford Bed of Vernon Formation.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


For more information, please contact Nancy Stamm, Geologic Names Committee Secretary.

Asterisk (*) indicates published by U.S. Geological Survey authors.

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