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Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Upper Homewood sandstone*
  • Modifications:
    • Named
  • Dominant lithology:
    • Sandstone
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Appalachian basin
Publication:

White, I.C., 1878, Report of progress in the Beaver River district of the bituminous coal fields of western Pennsylvania, with analyses of coal, cannel, coke, clay, limestone, and ore, from Butler and Beaver Counties, Pennsylvania by A.S. McCreath: Pennsylvania Geological Survey Report of Progress, 2nd series, v. Q, 337 p.


Summary:

Named as top member of Beaver River group. Named for Homewood Station, Beaver Co., western PA. Consists of yellowish-white, massive, conglomeratic sandstone. Thickness is 75 to 155 ft. Separated from overlying Brookville coal by 4 ft of fire clay. At type locality, where 155 ft thick, cuts out overlying Clarion coal group up to a higher horizon than Ferriferous (Vanport) limestone). Lies 20 to 80 ft above Connoquenessing (Lower Homewood) sandstone. [Age is Pennsylvanian.]

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Lower Homewood sandstone
  • Modifications:
    • Areal extent
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Appalachian basin
Publication:

Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Homewood sandstone member
  • Modifications:
    • Revised
    • Areal extent
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Appalachian basin
Publication:

Flint, N.K., 1951, Geology of Perry County: Ohio Division of Geological Survey Bulletin, 4th series, no. 48, 234 p.


Summary:

Extended into OH as Homewood sandstone member of Brookville cyclothem in Perry Co. Base of Homewood is considered boundary between Pottsville and Allegheny series.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Homewood sandstone member
  • Modifications:
    • Revised
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Appalachian basin
Publication:

Sturgeon, M.T., Smith, G.E., and Flint, A.E., 1958, The geology and mineral resources of Athens County, Ohio: Ohio Division of Geological Survey Bulletin, no. 57, 600 p., (incl. geologic map, scale 1:62,500, compiled by G.E. Smith and others)


Summary:

In Athens Co., OH, used as Homewood sandstone member of Brookville cyclothem. At type exposure in PA, Homewood is reported to include coalesced sandstones of various cycles of deposition, but in OH, Homewood is recognized as sandstone immediately below Brookville member and above Tionesta coal. Either Brookville underclay or marine Putnam Hill shale overlies Homewood; contact, where observed, is thin and gradational. Thickness is 30 ft.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Homewood sandstone and shale
  • Modifications:
    • Revised
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Appalachian basin
Publication:

Williams, E.G., 1960, Marine and fresh water fossiliferous beds in the Pottsville and Allegheny groups of western Pennsylvania: Journal of Paleontology, v. 34, no. 5, p. 908-922.


Summary:

Revised as Homewood sandstone and shale and placed at top of Mercer formation in PA.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Homewood Formation*
  • Modifications:
    • Revised
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Appalachian basin
Publication:

Carswell, L.D., and Bennett, G.D., 1963, Geology and hydrology of the Neshannock quadrangle, Mercer and Lawrence Counties, Pennsylvania: Pennsylvania Geological Survey Water Resource Report, 4th series, no. 15, 90 p.


Summary:

Revised as Homewood Formation of Pottsville Group. Locally divisible into an unnamed lower sandstone member and an unnamed upper shale member.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Homewood Sandstone Member*
  • Modifications:
    • Revised
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Appalachian basin
Publication:

Winslow, J.D., and White, G.W., 1966, Geology and ground-water resources of Portage County, Ohio: U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper, 511, 80 p.


Summary:

In OH, revised as Homewood Sandstone Member of Pottsville Formation.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Homewood Sandstone
  • Modifications:
    • Overview
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Appalachian basin
Publication:

Cardwell, D.H., Erwin, R.B., and Woodward, H.P., 1968, Geologic Map of West Virginia: West Virginia Geological and Economic Survey, scale 1:250,000


Summary:

Used as Homewood Sandstone in Kanawha Formation.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Homewood sandstone
  • Modifications:
    • Revised
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Appalachian basin
Publication:

Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Homewood Sandstone
  • Modifications:
    • Revised
    • Age modified
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Appalachian basin
Publication:

Sweeney, Joe, 1986, Oil and gas report and maps of Wirt, Roane, and Calhoun Counties, West Virginia: West Virginia Geological and Economic Survey Bulletin, no. 40, 84 p.


Summary:

Revised as Homewood Sandstone in Pottsville Group in WV. Age is Middle Pennsylvanian (Atokan).

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Homewood Sandstone Member*, Formation*
  • Modifications:
    • Overview
    • Areal extent
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Appalachian basin
Publication:

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Asterisk (*) indicates usage by the U.S. Geological Survey. Other usages by state geological surveys.

"No current usage" (†) implies that a name has been abandoned or has fallen into disuse. Former usage and, if known, replacement name given in parentheses ( ).

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