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Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Gasconade limestone
  • Modifications:
    • Original reference
  • Dominant lithology:
    • Limestone
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Ozark uplift
Publication:

Nason, F.L., 1892, Report on the iron ores of Missouri from field work prosecuted during the years 1891 and 1892: Missouri Bureau of Geology and Mines Report, v. 2, 366 p.


Summary:

Pg. vii, 12, 93, 114-115, pl. III. Gasconade limestone. Great series of limestone beds interstratified with thin beds of sandstone that underlie Roubidoux sandstone in Ozark uplift and compose lower formation of Ozark series. Includes 3rd and 4th Magnesian limestones and separating sandstones of earlier reports. [Age is Early Ordovician (Beekmantown).
Named for exposures on Gasconade River, central MO.

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 896, p. 804).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Gasconade limestone
  • Modifications:
    • Revised
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Ozark uplift
Publication:

Winslow, Arthur, 1894, Lead and zinc deposits: Missouri Bureau of Geology and Mines Report, v. 6-7, 763 p.


Summary:

Also Amer. Geol., v. 15, p. 81-89, 1895. Winslow stated that Gasconade limestone underlies Roubidoux or Saccharoidal(?) sandstone and includes Jefferson City limestone, Moreau sandstone, Osage limestone, Cole Camp sandstone, and Proctor limestone. [Age is Early Ordovician (Beekmantown).]

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 896, p. 804).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Gasconade limestone
  • Modifications:
    • Revised
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Ozark uplift
Publication:

Ball, S.H., and Smith, A.F., 1903, The geology of Miller County, with an introduction by E.R. Buckley: Missouri Bureau of Geology and Mines, 2nd series, v. 1, 207 p.


Summary:

Gasconade limestone. Whitish or grayish cherty and noncherty dolomite with beds of chert and occassional sandstones. Thickness 250 feet. Is = Third Magnesium limestone of Swallow. Underlies St. Elizabeth formation [Roubidoux] and overlies Gunter sandstone. [This definition was followed by S.H. Ball, 1904; C.F. Marbut, 1904; E.R. Buckley and H.A. Buehler, 1904; E.M. Shepard, 1904; E.R. Buckley, 1905; H.A. Buehler, 1907; and C.[R.] Keyes, 1914.]

Revised in that Gasconade conformably overlies Gunter sandstone (first used) and conformably underlies newly named St. Elizabeth formation. Extensively exposed within Miller Co, MO, Ozark uplift, especially along Osage River and its tributaries. Gasconade has a constant thickness of 240-250 ft. Characteristically forms rough topography; forms precipitous cliffs along Osage River and its large tributaries. Consists of cherty and non-cherty magnesian limestone or dolomite, chert beds and occasional interbeds of sandstone. Detailed lithologic description; several measured sections; geologic map. Contains some deposits of lead, zinc and iron ores and commercial quantities of silica (locally referred to as chalk). Assigned undifferentiated Cambrian and Ordovician age.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Gasconade limestone
  • Modifications:
    • Revised
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Ozark uplift
Publication:

Bain, H.F., and Ulrich, E.O., 1905, The copper deposits of Missouri, IN Contributions to economic geology, 1904; Copper: U.S. Geological Survey Bulletin, 260-F, p. F233-F235.


Summary:

Gasconade limestone. Chert-bearing dolomitic limestones and sandstones, 450 to 650 feet thick. Underlies Roubidoux formation and overlies Elvins formation. Is = 3rd and 4th Magnesium limestones and 3rd sandstone, also = Lesueur limestone. Includes Osage limestone, Gasconade limestone, Cole Camp sandstone, Gunter sandstone and Proctor limestone. [This definition was followed by G.H. Scherer, 1905.]
See also USGS Bull. 267, 1905.

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 896, p. 804).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Gasconade
  • Modifications:
    • Revised
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Ozark uplift
Publication:

Buckley, E.R., 1908, Lead and zinc resources of Missouri: American Mining Congress, Report of Proceedings, 10th annual session, November 11-16, 1907, Joplin, MO, p. 282-297.


Summary:

Pg. 286. Gasconade of Missouri underlies Roubidoux and unconformably overlies Proctor. [This definition of Gasconade (which includes Gunter sandstone member at base) was followed by C.F. Marbut, 1908; E.R. Buckley, 1909; R.S. Bassler, 1911; E.O. Ulrich, 1911; G.W. Crane, 1912; H.A. Buehler, 1917; C.L. Dake, 1918; E.B. Branson, 1918; M.E. Wilson, 1922; H.A. Buehler, 1922; and E.B. Branson, 1923; and it was for many years the accepted definition of the USGS.]

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 896, p. 804).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Gasconade formation
  • Modifications:
    • Revised
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Ozark uplift
Publication:

Marbut, C.F., 1908, The geology of Morgan County: Missouri Bureau of Geology and Mines Report, 2nd series, v. 7, 97 p.


Summary:

Divided into Gunter sandstone member (rank reduced) in lower part and unnamed magnesian limestone in upper part. Study area is in Morgan Co, MO, Ozark uplift. Gasconade in predominant formation over most of southern part of county. Thickness is about 260 ft. Unconformably overlies Proctor limestone; underlies Roubidoux formation. Measured sections; generalized section; geologic map. Assigned probable Cambrian age.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Gasconade formation
  • Modifications:
    • Revised
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Ozark uplift
Publication:

McQueen, H.S., 1930, Insoluble residues as a guide in stratigraphic studies: Missouri Bureau of Geology and Mines Report, 2nd series


Summary:

Gasconade formation restricted. Dolomite, light colored, finely crystalline with characteristic hard blue chert. Thickness 140 to 200 feet. Chert is dominant constituent; much of it is vitreous and quartzose, but lacks the even glassy texture of the Eminence and to some extent the chert of the Van Buren, underlies Roubidoux formation and unconformably overlies Van Buren formation. [See further explanation under Van Buren formation. This is definition of Gasconade dolomite that has been adopted by the Missouri Geol. Survey and is now followed by the USGS, ca. 1938.]

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 896, p. 804).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Gasconade formation
  • Modifications:
    • Areal extent
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Ozark uplift
Publication:

Grawe, O.R., 1945, Pyrite deposits of Missouri: Missouri Division of Geological Survey and Water Resources Report, 2nd series, v. 30, 482 p.


Summary:

Pg. 52 (fig. 2), 55-57. Gasconade formation. Basal part of formation contains pebbles of chert and sometimes of Precambrian igneous rocks derived from older formation, but commonly it is marked by sandstone or sandy dolomite, 15 to 25 feet thick. This basal zone is known as Gunter. It is overlain by 80 to 125 feet of thin- to medium-bedded cherty dolomite which in some Missouri Survey reports is referred to as Van Buren formation, and this in turn is overlain by massively bedded cherty dolomite, 141 to 200 feet thick. In those reports in which term Van Buren formatton is used, term Gasconade is restricted to this upper cherty dolomite. In present report, term Gasconade is used in its earlier unrestricted sense to include all strata between the Eminence and the Roubidoux. [Age is Early Ordovician.]

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 1200, p. 1478).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Gasconade formation
  • Modifications:
    • Areal extent
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Ozark uplift
Publication:

Knight, R.D., 1954, The Gunter member of the Gasconade formation (Lower Ordovician) in southern Missouri: Kansas Geological Society Guidebook for the Annual Field Conference, no. 17, p. 57-59., Also issued in Missouri Geol. Survey and Water Res. Rpt. Inv., no. 17, 1954


Summary:

Pg. 57. Gasconade formation. Includes Gunter member at base. Term Van Buren not used. Age is Early Ordovician.

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 1200, p. 1478).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Gasconade Dolomite
  • Modifications:
    • Overview
Publication:

Zeller, D.E. (editor), 1968, The stratigraphic succession in Kansas: Kansas Geological Survey Bulletin, no. 189, 81 p. [Available online from the Kansas Geological Survey: http://www.kgs.ku.edu/Publications/Bulletins/189]


Summary:

(Paleozoic Era; [Cambrian through Mississippian Systems] by E.D. Goebel, p. 13.) Gasconade Dolomite. Moore, Frye, Jewett, Lee, and O'Connor (1951) treated the Gasconade Dolomite and underlying Van Buren Formation as a unit (p. 119). Earlier, McQueen (1931, p. 18) [should this be p. 118?] differentiated the formations in Missouri by means of insoluble residues. Because the formations are difficult to separate in the subsurface far removed from outcrops, Keroher and Kirby (1948) designated the sequence in Kansas as Van Buren-Gasconade. The Missouri Geological Survey (Martin, Knight, and Hayes, 1961) no longer recognizes the Van Buren and includes the rock sequence from the top of the Eminence Dolomite to the base of the Roubidoux Formation as the Gasconade Dolomite. This practice is now followed in Kansas also. The Gasconade consists mainly of cherty, coarsely granular dolomite. The chert in the upper part, which is dense and gray to dark bluish-gray, grades downward into white, dense, quartzose chert. The Gasconade is unconformable on Eminence beds and probably also on Bonneterre, Lamotte, and Precambrian beds. Gasconade rocks are reported in the subsurface in a belt along the Missouri state line. The thickness ranges from 0 to more than 200 feet in southeastern Kansas.
References cited:
Keroher, R.P. and Kirby, J.J., 1948, "Upper Cambrian and Lower Ordovician rocks in Kansas," Kansas Geol. Survey Bull., no. 72, 140 p.
[McQueen, H.S., 1931 (1930), "Insoluble residues as a guide in stratigraphic studies," IN Buehler, H.A., Biennial report [1929-1930] of the State Geologist, transmitted to the 56th general assembly, Missouri Bur. Geol. and Mines, App. 1, p. 102-131.]
Martin, J.A., and others, 1961, "Ordovician System," IN Koenig, J.W., ed., "The stratigraphic succession in Missouri," Missouri Div. Geol. Survey and Water Res. Rept., 2nd ser., v. 40, p. 20-32.
Moore, R.C., and others, 1951, "The Kansas rock column," Kansas Geol. Survey Bull., no. 89, 132 p.

Source: Publication.


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Gasconade Dolomite
  • Modifications:
    • Overview
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Ozark uplift
Publication:

Willman, H.B., Atherton, Elwood, Buschbach, T.C., Collinson, Charles, Frye, J.C., Hopkins, M.E., Lineback, J.A., and Simon, J.A., 1975, Handbook of Illinois stratigraphy: Illinois Geological Survey Bulletin, no. 95, 261 p.


Summary:

Oneota Dolomite of IL is equivalent to Gasconade Formation of MO and to upper nonsandy part of Chepultepec Formation in KY subsurface.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Gasconade Dolomite*
  • Modifications:
    • Areal extent
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Illinois basin
    • Ozark uplift
Publication:

Harrison, R.W., 1997, Bedrock geologic map of the St. Louis 30' x 60' quadrangle, Missouri and Illinois: U.S. Geological Survey Miscellaneous Investigations Series Map, I-2533, 2 sheets, 7 p., scale 1:100,000 [http://ngmdb.usgs.gov/Prodesc/proddesc_13024.htm]


Summary:

Gasconade Dolomite of Early Ordovician (Canadian) age is present in subsurface of MO and IL in St. Louis area. Includes Gunter Sandstone Member.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Gasconade Dolomite*
  • Modifications:
    • Areal extent
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Ozark uplift
Publication:

Nelson, W.J., 1998, Bedrock geology of the Paducah 1 degree x 2 degrees CUSMAP quadrangle, Illinois, Kentucky, and Missouri, IN The Paducah CUSMAP quadrangle, resource and topographical investigations: U.S. Geological Survey Bulletin, 2150-B, p. B1-B36, (incl. geologic map, scale 1:250,000), A joint study conducted with Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, and Missouri geol. surveys [http://ngmdb.usgs.gov/Prodesc/proddesc_19757.htm]


Summary:

Ordovician (Canadian) Gasconade Dolomite occurs in subsurface on Ozark dome in MO. Correlates with Oneota Dolomite of Knox Group in Illinois basin in IL and KY. Basal Gunter Sandstone Member occurs sporadically in southern part of Illinois basin.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Gasconade Dolomite*
  • Modifications:
    • Areal extent
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Upper Mississippi embayment
    • Illinois basin
Publication:

Harrison, R.W., 1999, Geologic map of the Thebes quadrangle, Missouri and Illinois: U.S. Geological Survey Geologic Quadrangle Map, GQ-1779, scale 1:24,000 [http://ngmdb.usgs.gov/Prodesc/proddesc_19294.htm]


Summary:

Early Ordovician (Canadian) Gasconade Dolomite mapped undivided with Roubidoux Formation in subsurface of Upper Mississippi embayment in MO and Illinois basin in IL.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


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