U.S. Geological Survey Home AASG Logo USGS HOME CONTACT USGS SEARCH USGS
National Geologic Map Database
Geologic Unit: Ewing
Search archives
Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Ewing limestone
  • Modifications:
    • Named
  • Dominant lithology:
    • Limestone
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Appalachian basin
Publication:

Orton, Edward, 1878, Supplemental report on the geology of the Hanging Rock district, IN Report of the Geological Survey of Ohio; Part 1, Geology: Ohio Division of Geological Survey Report of Progress, 2nd series, v. 3, p. 883-941.


Summary:

Named as part of Conemaugh formation. Named for Ewing Site, Sunday Creek Valley, Hocking or Perry Co., southeastern OH. Extends from Sunday Creek Valley southward to Ohio River. Consists of ferruginous limestone. Thickness is about 5 ft. Found within Coal Measures, about 80 ft above Cambridge limestone and 40 ft below Ames limestone.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Ewing limestone
  • Modifications:
    • Revised
    • Overview
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Appalachian basin
Publication:

Hickok, W.O., IV, and Moyer, F.T., 1940, Geology and mineral resources of Fayette County, Pennsylvania: Pennsylvania Geological Survey County Report, 4th series, no. 26, 530 p.


Summary:

In PA, Ewing limestone assigned to Conemaugh group. Overlies Pittsburgh red beds; separated from overlying Amer limestone by Harlem coal. Thickness in Fayette Co., 5 to 10 ft.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Ewing limestone member
  • Modifications:
    • Revised
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Appalachian basin
Publication:

Norling, D.L., 1958, Geology and mineral resources of Morgan County, Ohio: Ohio Division of Geological Survey Bulletin, no. 56, 131 p.


Summary:

In Morgan Co., Ewing limestone member of Conemaugh series is nonpersistent. It stratigraphically overlies Cow Run sandstone and shale member. Occurs from 6 to 11 ft below Barton coal and from 30 to 40 ft below Ames limestone. Thickness ranges from 6 in. to 4.75 ft.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Ewing limestone member
  • Modifications:
    • Revised
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Appalachian basin
Publication:

Sturgeon, M.T., Smith, G.E., and Flint, A.E., 1958, The geology and mineral resources of Athens County, Ohio: Ohio Division of Geological Survey Bulletin, no. 57, 600 p., (incl. geologic map, scale 1:62,500, compiled by G.E. Smith and others)


Summary:

Ewing is member of Upper Bakerstown cyclothem in this report. Throughout outcrop area, the Ewing is represented by three lithologic varieties. First is single nodular layer 2 to 12 in. thick of light-gray to gray dense, brecciated or sandy micaceous limestone. Second type includes layers but more commonly nodules and veins of limestone distributed in thicknesses of up to 15 ft of sandy shale and shaly sandstone. Third type comprises small nodules of limestone embedded in clay shale. Limestone in any of these types may be ferruginous. In Dover Township, a 6-in. layer of ironstone represents Ewing member. Overlies Cow Run sandstone member. In Conemaugh series.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Ewing limestone
  • Modifications:
    • Overview
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Appalachian basin
Publication:

Rice, C.L., Hiett, J.K., and Koozmin, E.D., 1994, Glossary of Pennsylvanian stratigraphic names, central Appalachian basin, IN Rice, C.L., ed., Elements of Pennsylvanian stratigraphy, central Appalachian basin: Geological Society of America Special Paper, 294, p. 115-155.


Summary:

Ewing is an unranked nonmarine limestone below Upper Bakerstown or Barton coal in Glenshaw Formation of Conemaugh Group. Probably miscorrelated in MD with the Lavansville limestone of Pennsylvania.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Search archives

For more information, please contact Nancy Stamm, Geologic Names Committee Secretary.

Asterisk (*) indicates published by U.S. Geological Survey authors.

"No current usage" (†) implies that a name has been abandoned or has fallen into disuse. Former usage and, if known, replacement name given in parentheses ( ).

Slash (/) indicates name does not conform with nomenclatural guidelines (CSN, 1933; ACSN, 1961, 1970; NACSN, 1983, 2005). This may be explained within brackets ([ ]).