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Geologic Unit: Dayton
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Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Dayton stone
  • Modifications:
    • Named
  • Dominant lithology:
    • Limestone
    • Marl
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Cincinnati arch
Publication:

Orton, Edward, 1870, Report on geology of Montgomery County, Part III, IN Report of progress in 1869: Ohio Division of Geological Survey Report of Progress, 2nd series, p. 139-164.


Summary:

Named Dayton stone, the commercial name for rock quarried in vicinity of Dayton, Ohio. Also called Niagara formation. Consists of even-bedded limestone and marl. Thickness ranges from 5 to 50 ft. Underlain by Clinton formation; overlain by glacial drift.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Dayton formation
  • Modifications:
    • Overview
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Cincinnati arch
Publication:

Stout, Wilber, 1941, Dolomites and limestones of western Ohio: Ohio Division of Geological Survey Bulletin, 4th series, no. 42, 468 p.


Summary:

Designated Dayton formation of Niagara group. "The deposits are thin, varying from 7 to 13 feet and averaging only about 8 feet. Under normal development, made up of a number of even-bedded layers from 3 in. to 2 ft in thickness. The stone is compact, tough, and crystalline, little affected by weathering." Used extensively for masonry purposes. Underlain by Brassfield member. [formation affiliation uncertain]; overlain by Alger formation of Niagara group.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Dayton limestone
  • Modifications:
    • Revised
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Cincinnati arch
Publication:

Norris, S.E., Cross, W.P., and Goldthwait, R.P., 1950, The water resources of Greene County, Ohio: Ohio Division of Water Bulletin, no. 19, 52 p.


Summary:

Designated Dayton limestone of Niagara group. "The Dayton is a hard white limestone stratum about 8 ft thick and occurs in thin, well-defined beds." Underlain by Brassfield limestone; overlain by Osgood shale of Niagara group.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Dayton Limestone Member
  • Modifications:
    • Revised
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Cincinnati arch
Publication:

Rexroad, C.B., Branson, E.R., Smith, M.O., Summerson, C.H., and Boucot, A.J., 1965, The Silurian formations of east-central Kentucky and adjacent Ohio: Kentucky Geological Survey Bulletin, 10th series, no. 2, 34 p., Prepared in cooperation with Indiana Geol. Survey


Summary:

Reduced in rank to Dayton Limestone Member (uppermost member) of Noland Formation (new). Underlain by undifferentiated Noland Formation; overlain by glacial drift.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Dayton Dolomite Member*
  • Modifications:
    • Revised
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Cincinnati arch
Publication:

McDowell, R.C., 1983, Stratigraphy of the Silurian outcrop belt on the east side of the Cincinnati arch in Kentucky, with revisions in the nomenclature, IN Contributions to the geology of Kentucky: U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper, 1151-F, p. F1-F27. [Available online from the USGS PubsWarehouse: http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/pp/pp1151F]


Summary:

Designated Dayton Dolomite Member of Drowning Creek Formation (new) and of Alger Shale. "The Dayton is a light- to medium-gray, fine- to medium-grained calcareous dolomite that occurs in three or four beds totaling 1 to 3 ft in thickness. The dolomite is mostly dense and hard but locally porous or vuggy and is generally devoid of fossils." Underlain by undifferentiated Drowning Creek Formation and overlain by Estill Shale in most of area of report. Underlain by Lulbegrud Shale Member and overlain by Estill Shale Member of Alger Shale in small area near Colfax, Fleming Co. KY. Crops out in eastern KY, in Fleming Co. and northward, and in southern OH.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Dayton Limestone*, Dolomite Member*
  • Modifications:
    • Areal extent
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Appalachian basin
Publication:

Ryder, R.T., Repetski, J.E., and Harris, A.G., 1996, Stratigraphic framework of Cambrian and Ordovician rocks in the central Appalachian basin from Fayette County, Ohio, to Botetourt County, Virginia: U.S. Geological Survey Miscellaneous Investigations Series Map, I-2495.


Summary:

Geographically extended to Dayton into the subsurface of WV (OH-WV hinge zone) in section F-F' as the Dayton Dolomite Member of the Drowning Creek Formation. In OH (Waverly arch), it is called the Dayton Limestone.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


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For more information, please contact Nancy Stamm, Geologic Names Committee Secretary.

Asterisk (*) indicates usage by the U.S. Geological Survey. Other usages by state geological surveys.

"No current usage" (†) implies that a name has been abandoned or has fallen into disuse. Former usage and, if known, replacement name given in parentheses ( ).

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