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Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • "Checkerboard limestone"
  • Modifications:
    • Original reference
  • Dominant lithology:
    • [Limestone]
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Chautauqua platform
Publication:

Hutchinson, L.L., 1911, Preliminary report on the rock asphalt, asphaltite, petroleum, and natural gas in Oklahoma: Oklahoma Geological Survey Bulletin, no. 2, 256 p.


Summary:

Pg. 151-164. Lenapah limestone is same formation that is known as "Checkerboard limestone" in region of Glenn pool. Age is Pennsylvanian.

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 896, p. 409).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Checkerboard limestone
  • Modifications:
    • Areal extent
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Chautauqua platform
Publication:

Snider, L.C., 1913, Petroleum and natural gas in Oklahoma: Oklahoma City, OK, The Harlow-Ratliff Co., 196 p.


Summary:

[Pg. 107.] Checkerboard limestone is probably 100 feet above Lenapah limestone. [Age is Pennsylvanian.]

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 896, p. 409).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Checkerboard lime
  • Modifications:
    • Overview
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Chautauqua platform
Publication:

Fath, A.E., 1917, A structural reconnaissance in the vicinity of Beggs [Okmulgee County, Oklahoma], IN Shannon, C.W., Petroleum and natural gas in Oklahoma; Part II, a discustion of the oil and gas fields, and undeveloped areas of the State, by counties: Oklahoma Geological Survey Bulletin, no. 19, pt. 2, p. 369-374.


Summary:

Pg. 369-372. The limestone, 2 feet thick, locally known as Checkerboard lime, outcrops in creek bed at old "Checkerboard Crossing" near E-W/4 line of sec. 22, T. 15 N., R. 11 E. Age is Pennsylvanian.

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 896, p. 409).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Checkerboard limestone
  • Modifications:
    • Overview
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Chautauqua platform

Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Checkboard lime
  • Modifications:
    • Overview
  • Dominant lithology:
    • Limestone
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Chautauqua platform
Publication:

Clark, E.W., and Bauer, C.M., 1921, Notes on geology of the Okmulgee district [Oklahoma]: American Association of Petroleum Geologists Bulletin, v. 5, no. 2, p. 282-292. [Available online, with subscription, from AAPG archives: http://www.aapg.org/datasystems or http://search.datapages.com]


Summary:

Pg. 282-292. Checkerboard lime is a hard blue limestone, 4 feet in average thickness, which contains peculiar semicircular markings caused by presence of fossil brachiopods. Weathered surface usually of light cream or very light yellow color. Breaks into blocks, nearly cubical and 4+/- feet on each side. Remarkable for persistent character, such as thickness, color, resistance to weathering, peculiar fossil markings, jointing, etc. Present in Okmulgee district, Oklahoma. Has been mapped for a distance of 20 miles. Can be traced from Deep Fork in sec. 19, T. 14 N., R. 11 E., through Mounds and Jenks, over Turkey Mountain and into Tulsa, but can not be followed continuously southwest from Deep Fork. Lies 100 to 120 feet above Seminole conglomerate. Age is Pennsylvanian.

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 896, p. 409).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Checkerboard limestone
  • Modifications:
    • Overview
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Chautauqua platform
Publication:

McCoy, A.W., 1921, A short sketch of the paleogeography and historical geology of the Midcontinent oil district and its importance to petroleum geology: American Association of Petroleum Geologists Bulletin, v. 5, no. 5, p. 541-584. [Available online, with subscription, from AAPG archives: http://www.aapg.org/datasystems or http://search.datapages.com]


Summary:

Pg. 541-550. According to general stratigraphic relation of Checkerboard limestone to Lenapah limestone of Oklahoma, as described by Ohern, the Checkerboard limestone has been tentatively regarded as = base of Kansas City formation or the Hertha limestone. Age is Pennsylvanian.

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 896, p. 409).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Checkerboard limestone member
  • Modifications:
    • Principal reference
    • Revised
  • Dominant lithology:
    • Limestone
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Chautauqua platform
Publication:

Gould, C.N., 1925, Index to the stratigraphy of Oklahoma, with lists of characteristic fossils by C.E. Decker: Oklahoma Geological Survey Bulletin, no. 35, 115 p.


Summary:

Pg. 72. Checkerboard limestone member of Coffeyville formation. Lies near base of that formation. It is 2.5 to 3 feet thick, fine-grained, fossiliferous, bluish white on fresh surfaces but weathers yellowish white. In bare areas, it presents a "checkerboard" appearance, due to solution channels along joints, which occur in two sets, the one crossing the other. From this feature the limestone was for years known as "Checkerboard lime," but the geographic location which is here designated as its type locality is the exposures on Checkerboard Creek in T. 15 N., R. 11 E. A good exposure may be seen at "Checkerboard Crossing" of the creek, near E-W/4 line of sec. 22, T. 15 N., 11 E. Age is Pennsylvanian.

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 896, p. 409).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Checkerboard limestone
  • Modifications:
    • Revised
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Chautauqua platform
Publication:

Moore, R.C., Newell, N.D., Dott, R.H., and Borden, J.L., 1937, Definition and classification of the Missouri subseries of the Pennsylvanian series in northeastern Oklahoma, IN Southeastern Kansas and northeastern Oklahoma: Kansas Geological Society Guidebook for the Annual Field Conference, no. 11, p. 39-43.


Summary:

Pg. 40 (table), 42. Checkerboard limestone of Skiatook group. Rank raised to formation in Skiatook group. Overlies Seminole sandstone; underlies Coffeyville shale (restricted).

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 1200, p. 739-740).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Checkerboard limestone
  • Modifications:
    • Areal extent
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Chautauqua platform

Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Checkerboard limestone
  • Modifications:
    • Overview
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Chautauqua platform
Publication:

Moore, R.C., Frye, J.C., Jewett, J.M., Lee, Wallace, and O'Connor, H.G., 1951, The Kansas rock column: Kansas Geological Survey Bulletin, no. 89, 132 p.


Summary:

Pg. 91. Checkerboard limestone of Pleasanton group. In Kansas, included in Pleasanton group; underlies shales below Knobtown sandstone. Thickness ranges from featheredge to about 6 feet.

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 1200, p. 739-740).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Checkerboard limestone
  • Modifications:
    • Overview
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Chautauqua platform
Publication:

Oakes, M.C., 1959, Geology and mineral resources of Creek County, Oklahoma, with a section on oil and gas in Creek County, Oklahoma, by Louise Jordan: Oklahoma Geological Survey Bulletin, no. 81, 134 p., (incl. geologic map under separate cover)


Summary:

Pg. 16-17. Name Checkerboard seems to have crept into general usage without formal definition. Hutchinson (1911) made reference to it by name. Smith (1914, USGS Bull. 541) used name without describing it. Fath and Emery (1917, Oklahoma Geol. Survey Bull., no. 35) described the Checkerboard and designated type exposure. Checkerboard limestone in Creek County [this report] is single bed about 2.5 feet thick. Conformably overlies Seminole formation; conformably underlies Coffeyville formation. [Is formation of] Skiatook group. Age is Pennsylvanian (Missourian).

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 1200, p. 739-740).


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