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National Geologic Map Database
Geologic Unit: Burlingame
Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Burlingame limestone
  • Modifications:
    • Original reference
  • Dominant lithology:
    • Limestone
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Forest City basin
Publication:

Hall, J.G., 1896, A geologic section from state line, opposite Boicourt, to Alma, principally along the Osage River [Kansas], Chapter V, IN Haworth, Erasmus, and others, [Stratigraphy of the Carboniferous of Kansas and allied subjects]: Kansas Geological Survey [Report], v. 1, p. 99-106.


Summary:

Pg. 105. Burlingame limestone. Just west of Burlingame [Osage County], eastern Kansas, system No. 5 makes its first appearance. It is 8 feet thick, brown, shelly, and covers the third and last heavy bed of shales in this section, which is 150 or 200 feet thick. Age is Pennsylvanian.

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 896, 1200); supplemental information from GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Denver GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Burlingame limestone
  • Modifications:
    • Areal extent
Publication:

Haworth, Erasmus, 1898, Stratigraphy of the Kansas coal measures, Part 1, IN Special report on coal: Kansas Geological Survey [Report], v. 3, p. 13-105.


Summary:

Pg. 72, 73, 94, 105. Burlingame limestone. Proposed by J.G. Hall for limestone system No. 5, consisting of brown shelly limestone 8 feet thick, overlying Osage shale. ["Osage" as here used included †Burlingame (Scranton) shale.]

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 896, p. 298).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Burlingame limestone member
  • Modifications:
    • Revised
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Forest City basin
Publication:

Condra, G.E., and Bengtson, N.A., 1915, The Pennsylvanian formations of southeastern Nebraska: Nebraska Academy of Sciences Publications, v. 9, no. 2, 60 p., See also "Modern classifications of the Pennsylvanian rocks of eastern Kansas and southeastern Nebraska," compiled by M.G. Wilmarth, Secretary of Committee on Geologic Names, USGS unpub. corr. chart, Oct. 1936, sheet 1


Summary:

Burlingame limestone member of Nemaha formation. Bluish, brown-weathering, hard, massive, fossiliferous limestone. Thickness 2 to 5 feet. Separated from underlying Rulo limestone member of Nemaha by 7 to 12 feet of unnamed shale and from overlying Fargo limestone member of Nemaha by 11 to 32 feet of unnamed shale. Age is Pennsylvanian. Report includes measured sections, cross sections.

Source: GNC KS-NE Pennsylvanian Corr. Chart, sheet 1, Oct. 1936; supplemental information from GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Denver GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Burlingame limestone formation
  • Modifications:
    • Revised
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Forest City basin
    • Nemaha anticline
Publication:

Condra, G.E., 1935, Geologic cross-section, Forest City, Missouri to south of Du Bois, Nebraska: Nebraska Geological Survey Paper, no. 8, 23 p., Issued late in 1935. See also USGS unpub. corr. charts of Pennsylvanian and Permian rocks of KS and NE, compiled by M.G. Wilmarth, Secretary of Committee on Geologic Names, Oct. 1936


Summary:

Pg. 5, 10; G.E. Condra and E.C. Reed, 1943, Nebraska Geol. Survey Bull., no. 14, p. 45-46. Burlingame limestone formation of Wabaunsee group. Thickness 20+/- feet. In Nebraska, comprises the following members (ascending): Taylor Branch limestone, bluish-gray, massive, weathers brownish, 2 to 4.5 feet; Winnebago shale, bluish, argillaceous, with some limy fossiliferous seams, 8 to 12 feet; and South Fork limestone, one massive bluish bed, or 2 or 3 beds separated by shale, 2 to 6 feet. Overlies Scranton shale formation; underlies Soldier Creek shale formation. Age is Late Pennsylvanian (Virgilian).
[Misprint (USGS Bull. 1200, p. 542): Condra's Nebraska Geol. Survey Paper no. 8 was published in 1935, not 1933.]

Source: Publication; US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 1200, p. 541); GNC KS-NE Pennsylvanian Corr. Chart, sheet 2, Oct. 1936.


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Burlingame limestone member
    • Burlingame limestone
  • Modifications:
    • Overview
Publication:

Wilmarth, M.G., 1935, [Selected Geologic Names Committee remarks (ca. 1930-1935) on Carboniferous and Permian rocks of the Midcontinent], IN Wilmarth, M.G., 1938, Lexicon of geologic names of the United States (including Alaska): U.S. Geological Survey Bulletin, 896, pts. 1-2, 2396 p., See also Wilmarth, M.G., compiler, USGS unpub. corr. charts of Missouri (Mar. 1930); Iowa (Apr. 1930); Texas (Sept. 1930); Oklahoma (Jan. 1931, Feb. 1931); Kansas and Nebraska (Oct. 1936)


Summary:

Burlingame limestone member, basal member of Wabaunsee formation in Missouri. In Kansas the Wabaunsee is treated as a group and the Burlingame as a formation. The present Kansas and Nebraska Surveys use Soldier Creek shale for the beds overlying Burlingame limestone.
See also "Modern classifications of the Pennsylvanian rocks of eastern Kansas and southeastern Nebraska," compiled by M.G. Wilmarth, Secretary of Committee on Geologic Names, USGS unpub. corr. chart, Oct. 1936, 2 sheets.

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 896, p. 298).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Burlingame limestone
  • Modifications:
    • Revised
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Forest City basin
Publication:

Moore, R.C., 1936, Stratigraphic classification of the Pennsylvanian rocks of Kansas: Kansas Geological Survey Bulletin, no. 22, 256 p., See also "Modern classifications of the Pennsylvanian rocks of eastern Kansas and southeastern Nebraska," compiled by M.G. Wilmarth, Secretary of Committee on Geologic Names, USGS unpub. corr. chart, Oct. 1936, sheet 2


Summary:

Pg. 215-216. Burlingame limestone of Wabaunsee group. Soldier Creek shale and overlying Wakarusa limestone have been included by various writers in Burlingame limestone at several places in central and southern Kansas. The name Burlingame should be restricted to lower limestone, which seems to accord with Hall's original description. Thickness 4 to 16 feet. Has been mapped from southern Nebraska across Kansas, and identified 40+/- miles south of Kansas-Oklahoma line. The limestone makes a fairly prominent escarpment that crosses western part of Burlingame, Kansas. Age is Late Pennsylvanian (Virgil).

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 896, p. 298); GNC KS-NE Pennsylvanian Corr. Chart, sheet 2, Oct. 1936.


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Burlingame limestone
  • Modifications:
    • Areal extent
  • Dominant lithology:
    • Limestone
    • Shale
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Forest City basin
Publication:

Wood, L.W., 1941, The geology of Adams County [Iowa], IN Trowbridge, A.C., and Hershey, H.G., Annual reports, [1934-1939]: Iowa Geological Survey Annual Report, v. 37, p. 263-373, (incl. geologic map)


Summary:

Pg. 309 (fig. 14). Burlingame limestone. Graphic section of Pennsylvanian in Adams County, southeastern Iowa, shows Burlingame limestone occurring below Soldier Creek shale and above Silver Lake shale. Age is Late Pennsylvanian (Virgilian).

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 1200, p. 541).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Burlingame limestone
  • Modifications:
    • Overview
    • Revised(?)
Publication:

Moore, R.C. (chairman), 1944, Correlation of Pennsylvanian formations of North America; Chart No. 6, Correlation chart of Pennsylvanian rocks of North America: Geological Society of America Bulletin, v. 55, no. 6, p. 657-706., Prepared by the Pennsylvanian Subcommittee, R.C. Moore, chairman, under the auspices of the National Research Council Committee on Stratigraphy, C.O. Dunbar, chairman


Summary:

Chart 6 (column 32). Midcontinent region, collated by R.C. Moore; column 32 (Missouri); also column 31 (Iowa) and 33 (Kansas and Nebraska). In Missouri, Burlingame limestone occurs in middle part of Shawnee group; above Howard limestone and below Wakarusa limestone, separated by unnamed units. In Nebraska and Kansas, Burlingame limestone occurs in lower part of Wabaunsee group; above Howard limestone and below Wakarusa (both also in Wabaunsee group), separated by unnamed units.

Source: Publication; US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 1200, p. 541).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Burlingame limestone
  • Modifications:
    • Revised
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Forest City basin
Publication:

Condra, G.E., 1949, The nomenclature, type localities, and correlation of the Pennsylvanian subdivisions in eastern Nebraska and adjacent states: Nebraska Geological Survey Bulletin, no. 16, 67 p.


Summary:

Pg. 18. [Stratigraphically restricted Burlingame.] Three limestones and two shales now included in Soldier Creek shale were formerly included in the Burlingame.

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 1200, p. 541).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Burlingame limestone
  • Modifications:
    • Overview
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Forest City basin
Publication:

Greene, F.C., and Searight, W.V., 1949, Revision of the classification of the post-Cherokee Pennsylvanian beds of Missouri: Missouri Division of Geological Survey and Water Resources Report of Investigations, no. 11, 22 p.


Summary:

Pg. 20. Assigned to Wabaunsee group when that group was redefined for Missouri.

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 1200, p. 541).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Burlingame limestone member*
  • Modifications:
    • Revised
Publication:

Moore, R.C., and Mudge, M.R., 1956, Reclassification of some Lower Permian and Upper Pennsylvanian strata in northern Midcontinent, IN Geological notes: American Association of Petroleum Geologists Bulletin, v. 40, no. 9, p. 2271-2278. [Available online, with subscription, from AAPG archives: http://www.aapg.org/datasystems or http://search.datapages.com]


Summary:

Pg. 2273-2275. Burlingame limestone member of Bern limestone. Rank reduced to member status in Bern limestone (new). Underlies Soldier Creek shale member; overlies Silver Lake shale member of Scranton shale (reintroduced as a formation). Age is Late Pennsylvanian (Virgilian).

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 1200, p. 541).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Burlingame limestone
  • Modifications:
    • Areal extent
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Forest City basin
Publication:

Hershey, H.G., Brown, C.N., Northup, R.C., and Van Eck, Orville, 1960, Highway construction materials from the consolidated rocks of southwestern Iowa: Iowa Highway Research Bulletin, no. 15, 151 p.


Summary:

Pg. 13, fig. 5. Burlingame limestone of Wabaunsee group. Consists of three limestone beds separated by shale. Upper limestone, about 6 inches thick, is dark gray and finely crystalline, contains fossil fragments, and is underlain by dark-gray clayey shale about 1.5 feet thick. The lower two limestones are separated by calcareous laminated gray shale about 5 feet thick. Upper of the two limestones is gray, argillaceous, and blocky; lower is concretionary, sandy, and fragmental. Total thickness 12 feet. Underlies Soldier Creek shale; overlies Silver Lake shale. Age is Late Pennsylvanian (Virgilian).

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 1200, p. 541).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Burlingame Limestone Member
  • Modifications:
    • Overview
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Forest City basin
Publication:

Zeller, D.E. (editor), 1968, The stratigraphic succession in Kansas: Kansas Geological Survey Bulletin, no. 189, 81 p. [Available online from the Kansas Geological Survey: http://www.kgs.ku.edu/Publications/Bulletins/189]


Summary:

(Paleozoic Era; Pennsylvanian System by J.M Jewett, H.G. O'Connor, and D.E. Zeller, p. 40.) Burlingame Limestone Member of Bern Limestone of Nemaha subgroup [informal] of Wabaunsee Group. Recognized in Kansas. A fine-grained, hard, thick-bedded, light-gray to brown limestone that appears mottled and brecciated in some exposures. Shale partings occur in the limestone beds. Fusulinids are common in the more persistent part, and algal remains are conspicuous near the top. Biscuit-like algal deposits, composed of SOMPHOSPONGIA, are numerous in a few exposures in northeastern Kansas. Thickness from about 2 to 16 feet. Occurs above Silver Lake Shale Member of Scranton Shale and below Soldier Creek Shale Member of Bern Limestone. Age is Late Pennsylvanian (Virgilian).
["Subgroup" not recognized as a formal stratigraphic rank term (CSN, 1933; ACSN, 1961, 1970; NACSN, 1983, 2005). Considered informal and should not be capitalized.]

Source: Publication.


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Burlingame Limestone Member
  • Modifications:
    • Overview
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Forest City basin
Publication:

Thompson, T.L., 1995, The stratigraphic succession in Missouri (Revised-1995): Missouri Division of Geology and Land Survey, 2nd series, v. 40 Revised, 188 p.


Summary:

Pg. 129, 127 (fig. 37). Burlingame Limestone Member, basal member of Bern Formation of Nemaha subgroup [informal] of Wabaunsee Group. Where exposed in Atchison County, Missouri, is commonly a single, massive bed of argillaceous limestone; average thickness about 2 feet. Uppermost part of this bed contains a large amount of fossil material, which is coated with "Osagia." In Nodaway County, Missouri, composed (from the base upward) of about 1 foot of greenish-gray, dense, algal limestone, 3 to 4 feet of calcareous claystone, and of a few inches of slabby limestone. Shown on stratigraphic section overlying Silver Lake Shale Member of Scranton Formation of Sacfox subgroup [informal] of Wabaunsee Group, and underlying Soldier Creek Shale Member of Bern Formation. Age is Late Pennsylvanian (Virgilian).
["Subgroup" not recognized as a formal stratigraphic rank term (CSN, 1933; ACSN, 1961, 1970; NACSN, 1983, 2005). Considered informal and should not be capitalized.]

Source: Publication.


For more information, please contact Nancy Stamm, Geologic Names Committee Secretary.

Asterisk (*) indicates usage by the U.S. Geological Survey. Other usages by state geological surveys.

"No current usage" (†) implies that a name has been abandoned or has fallen into disuse. Former usage and, if known, replacement name given in parentheses ( ).

Slash (/) indicates name does not conform with nomenclatural guidelines (CSN, 1933; ACSN, 1961, 1970; NACSN, 1983, 2005). This may be explained within brackets ([ ]).