U.S. Geological Survey Home AASG Logo USGS HOME CONTACT USGS SEARCH USGS

National Geologic Map Database

NGMDB
Geologic Unit: Sharpsville
Search archives
Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Sharpsville sandstone
  • Modifications:
    • Named
  • Dominant lithology:
    • Sandstone
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Appalachian basin
Publication: Summary:

Sharpsville sandstone is a well-defined and persistent group of alternating layers of sandstone and shale in beds 1 to 5 ft thick. The shale layers are usually much thinner than the sandstone layers. The fine-grained sandstones are a peculiar dark grayish brown color and are quarried at many places along Shenango River, especially at Sharpsville. Thickness of formation 50 to 60 ft. Underlies Crawford shales and overlies Orangeville shales.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).

NGMDB
Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Sharpsville sandstone*
  • Modifications:
    • Revised
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Appalachian basin
Publication: Summary:

Cuyahoga, in its typical area, is elevated to group rank and its subdivisions (ascending) Orangeville shale, Sharpsville sandstone, and Meadville shale are treated as formations. Thickness 25 to 50 ft in Cleveland, OH, area. Contacts with Orangeville and Meadville transitional.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).

NGMDB
Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Sharpsville sandstone*
  • Modifications:
    • Overview
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Appalachian basin
Publication: Summary:

Sharpsville is composed of varying amounts of flaggy sandstone and interbedded sandy shales. Base is drawn at first massive sandstone in shale section above Berea sandstone or Corry sandstone. Locally, near Warren, OH, and Meadville, PA, lower part of Sharpsville is composed almost completely of massive sandstone and can be used for local correlation. Elsewhere the Sharpsville is composed of thin flaggy sandstones, and boundaries can not be drawn definitely. Base of Sharpsville is irregular. In some areas, flags of the Sharpsville are almost in contact with the Berea, but in some areas a thick shale separates the two units. In vicinity of Titusville, PA, the Sharpsville merges with underlying Orangeville shale.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).

NGMDB
Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Sharpsville sandstone*
  • Modifications:
    • Overview
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Appalachian basin
Publication: Summary:

In OH, base of Sharpsville is generally placed at base of first massive bed of siltstone in shale sequence above the Berea except in those areas where the Aurora or Chardon member is present near base of Orangeville shale. In northwestern PA, the Sharpsville is first massive siltstone above Bartholomew siltstone member of Orangeville shale, except in local area in Crawford Co. where the Bartholomew is absent and its place is occupied by Hungry Run sandstone member.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).

NGMDB
Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Sharpsville Sandstone*
  • Modifications:
    • Age modified
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Appalachian basin
Publication: Summary:

Age of Sharpsville Sandstone of Cuyahoga Group changed from Mississippian to Early Mississippian.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).

NGMDB
Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Sharpsville Sandstone Member
  • Modifications:
    • Revised
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Appalachian basin
Publication: Summary:

In PA, the Cuyahoga has traditionally been given group rank and subdivided into three formations: Orangeville Shale, Sharpsville Sandstone, and Meadville Shale. Because of limited mappability, the subdivisions are herein regarded as members of the Cuyahoga Formation, which is practically all shale in the study area.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).

NGMDB
Search archives

For more information, please contact Nancy Stamm, Geologic Names Committee Secretary.

Asterisk (*) indicates usage by the U.S. Geological Survey. Other usages by state geological surveys.

"No current usage" (†) implies that a name has been abandoned or has fallen into disuse. Former usage and, if known, replacement name given in parentheses ( ).

Slash (/) indicates name does not conform with nomenclatural guidelines (CSN, 1933; ACSN, 1961, 1970; NACSN, 1983, 2005). This may be explained within brackets ([ ]).

Find Us:

twitter

Accessibility FOIA Privacy Policies and Notices

Take Pride in America logo USA.gov logo U.S. Department of the Interior | U.S. Geological Survey
Supported by the National Cooperative Geologic Mapping Program
URL: http://ngmdb.usgs.gov
Page Contact Information: Personnel
Page Last Modified: Tue Jun 3 16:28:54 2014