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National Geologic Map Database
Geologic Unit: Tecuya
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Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Tecuya beds
  • Modifications:
    • Named
    • Biostratigraphic dating
  • Dominant lithology:
    • Sandstone
    • Shale
    • Lava
    • Tuff
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Transverse Ranges province
Publication:

Stock, Chester, 1920, An early Tertiary vertebrate fauna from the southern Coast Ranges of California: University of California Publications in Geological Sciences, v. 12, no. 4, p. 267-276.


Summary:

Unit is named the Tecuja [note spelling] beds. Consists of red colored sandstones and shales; also includes tuffs and lavas. Conglomerates are also present in several horizons. Age is [Oligocene or Miocene].

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Menlo GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Tecuya formation
  • Modifications:
    • Revised
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Transverse Ranges province

Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Tecuya Formation*
  • Modifications:
    • Adopted
    • Geochronologic dating
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Transverse Ranges province
Publication:

Nilsen, T.H., Dibblee, T.W., Jr., and Addicott, W.O., 1973, Lower and middle Tertiary stratigraphic units of the San Emigdio and western Tehachapi Mountains, California, IN Contributions to stratigraphy: U.S. Geological Survey Bulletin, 1372-H, p. H1-H23.


Summary:

Tecuja beds of Stock (1920) and Tecuya formation of Marks (1943) is adopted as the Tecuya Formation. Is informally divided into a lower unit consisting of interbedded conglomerates, sandstones, and mudstones, with local breccias in the lower part; a volcanic unit consisting of black fine-grained ophitic basalt and some scoriaceous basalt and pinkish-brown-weathering blue-gray dacite; and an upper unit consisting of crudely interbedded red, green buff, and blue-gray cobble and pebble conglomerates, sandstones, and mudstones. Thickness of type section is approximately 2,350 ft. [Conformably] overlies the Tejon Formation; conformably underlies and interfingers with the Temblor Formation. Age is Eocene(?) to Miocene based on isotopic dates of 22.3 +/-0.7 Ma to 21.5 +/-0.7 Ma from the volcanic unit and from fossils [foraminifers, mollusks] and stratigraphic relations.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Menlo GNULEX).


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For more information, please contact Nancy Stamm, Geologic Names Committee Secretary.

Asterisk (*) indicates published by U.S. Geological Survey authors.

"No current usage" (†) implies that a name has been abandoned or has fallen into disuse. Former usage and, if known, replacement name given in parentheses ( ).

Slash (/) indicates name does not conform with nomenclatural guidelines (CSN, 1933; ACSN, 1961, 1970; NACSN, 1983, 2005). This may be explained within brackets ([ ]).