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National Geologic Map Database
Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Stringtown shale*
  • Modifications:
    • Original reference
  • Dominant lithology:
    • Shale
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Arkoma basin
    • Ouachita folded belt
Publication:

Taff, J.A., 1902, Atoka folio, Indian Territory: U.S. Geological Survey Geologic Atlas of the United States Folio, GF-79, 8 p., scale 1:125,000


Summary:

Stringtown shale. Upper part black fissile cherty shale; lower part greenish fissile friable shales with occasional inclusions of calcareous cone-in-cone and ironstone concretions. Thickness 600 feet. Underlies Talihina chert. Base not defined. [In Arkansas the name has been used in a restricted sense.]
[Named from Stringtown, Atoka Co., southeastern OK.]

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 896, p. 2076-2077).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Stringtown shale
  • Modifications:
    • Areal extent
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Ouachita folded belt
Publication:

Purdue, A.H., 1909, The slates of Arkansas: Arkansas Geological Survey, p. 1-95, (incl. geologic map)


Summary:

Stringtown shale. [Name applied in a restricted sense.] Consists of lower calcareous part and upper shaly part. Lower part, up to 75 feet thick, contains lenses of bluish limestone; is sometimes conglomeratic at base. Upper part, 50 to 75 feet thick, is soft black shale containing graphite; thin beds of chert and limestone occur near top. Total thickness 75 to 150 feet. Rests unconformably on Ouachita shale; underlies Bigfork chert. Fossils (graptolites). Age is Ordovician.

Source: Modified from GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Denver GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Stringtown shale*
  • Modifications:
    • Biostratigraphic dating
Publication:

Ulrich, E.O., 1911, Revision of the Paleozoic systems: Geological Society of America Bulletin, v. 22, p. 281-680.


Summary:

Pg. 677. Stringtown shale contains Normanskill fossils at 3 horizons. [The USGS classifies Normanskill as of Chazy and Middle(?) Ordovician age.]

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 896, p. 2076-2077).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Stringtown shale
  • Modifications:
    • Age modified
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Ouachita folded belt
Publication:

Wallis, B.F., 1915, The geology and economic value of the Wapanucka limestone of Oklahoma: Oklahoma Geological Survey Bulletin, no. 23, 102 p.


Summary:

Pg. 23-31. Talihina chert and most of Stringtown shale were deposited in Ouachita Mountains while Viola limestone was being deposited in Arbuckle Mountains. Basal part of Stringtown is of Black River age and corresponds to upper part of Simpson formation.

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 896, p. 2076-2077).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Stringtown shale*
  • Modifications:
    • Not used
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Ouachita folded belt
Publication:

Miser, H.D., 1918, Manganese deposits of the Caddo Gap and De Queen quadrangles, Arkansas, IN Contributions to economic geology (short papers and preliminary reports), 1917; Part 1, Metals and nonmetals except fuels: U.S. Geological Survey Bulletin, 660-C, p. C59-C122.


Summary:

Pg. 67. The use of Stringtown shale has been discontinued in this area [Caddo Gap and DeQueen quadrangles, AR-OK] because the beds to which it has been applied do not form a mappable unit distinct from rest of shale above Blakely sandstone; because the graptolites supposed to be characteristic of it have apparently been found well down in underlying shale; and because, according to E.O. Ulrich, the limits and character of Stringtown shale at type locality in Oklahoma are in doubt. With recognition of Blakely sandstone as distinct formation, and failure to separate the Stringtown, it became necessary to give a new name (Womble shale) to whole interval between Blakely sandstone [below] and Bigfork chert [above].

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 896, p. 2076-2077).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Stringtown shale*
  • Modifications:
    • Age modified
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Arkoma basin
    • Ouachita folded belt
Publication:

Gould, C.N., 1925, Index to the stratigraphy of Oklahoma, with lists of characteristic fossils by C.E. Decker: Oklahoma Geological Survey Bulletin, no. 35, 115 p.


Summary:

Pg. 34. Stringtown shale is Lower Ordovician and correlates with upper part of Simpson formation, Womble and Blakely sandstones, and St. Peter ("Burgen") sandstone.

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 896, p. 2076-2077).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Stringtown shale*
  • Modifications:
    • Areal extent
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Arkoma basin
    • Ouachita folded belt
Publication:

Miser, H.D., 1926, Geologic map of Oklahoma: U.S. Geological Survey [State Geologic Map], scale 1:500,000


Summary:

Placed Strington shale opposite Womble schistose sandstone, Blakely sandstone, Mazarn shale, and St. Peter ("Burgen") sandstone.

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 896, p. 2076-2077).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Stringtown shale*
  • Modifications:
    • Age modified
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Arkoma basin
    • Ouachita folded belt
Publication:

Ulrich, E.O., 1927, Fossiliferous boulders in the Ouachita "Caney" shale and the age of the shale containing them: Oklahoma Geological Survey Bulletin, no. 45, 48 p.


Summary:

Stringtown or Womble shale underlies Bigfork chert, overlies Blakely sandstone, and is of basal Black River and upper Chazy (Blount) age.

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 896, p. 2076-2077).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Stringtown shale*
  • Modifications:
    • Areal extent
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • South Oklahoma folded belt
Publication:

Miser, H.D., and Sellards, E.H., 1931, Pre-Cretaceous rocks found in wells in Gulf Coastal Plains south of Ouachita Mountains: American Association of Petroleum Geologists Bulletin, v. 15, no. 7, p. 801-818. [Available online, with subscription, from AAPG archives: http://www.aapg.org/datasystems or http://search.datapages.com]


Summary:

Pg. 817. Shales and cherts obtained from the Wall well in Grayson County, [northern Texas], were found to contain Ordovician fossils, and are believed to represent the Big Fork chert and Stringtown shales of the Ouachita section. Lie immediately below Cretaceous rocks.

Source: Geol. Texas (1933, v. 1, p. 130, 131-132).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Stringtown shale
  • Modifications:
    • Biostratigraphic dating
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Ouachita folded belt
Publication:

Decker, C.E., 1936, Some tentative correlations on the basis of graptolites of Oklahoma and Arkansas: American Association of Petroleum Geologists Bulletin, v. 20, no. 3, p. 301-311. [Available online, with subscription, from AAPG archives: http://www.aapg.org/datasystems or http://search.datapages.com]


Summary:

In Oklahoma, upper and middle parts of Stringtown shale are equivalent to basal part Viola limestone, based on graptolites; also correlated with Womble, Normanskill, and Glenkiln shales. Age is Ordovician.

Source: Modified from GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Denver GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Stringtown shale†
  • Modifications:
    • Abandoned
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Arkoma basin
    • Ouachita folded belt
Publication:

Wilmarth, M.G., 1938, [Selected Geologic Names Committee remarks], IN Wilmarth, M.G., 1938, Lexicon of geologic names of the United States (including Alaska): U.S. Geological Survey Bulletin, 896, pts. 1-2, 2396 p.


Summary:

†Stringtown shale. The USGS has now replaced this name with Womble shale, which affords a better type locality and which contains in its upper part beds similar, lithologically and faunally, to Stringtown shale. (See paper by T.A. Hendricks, M.M. Knechtel, and Josiah Bridge, in AAPG Bull., v. 21, no. 1, 1937, p. 1-29.)

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 896, p. 2076-2077).


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For more information, please contact Nancy Stamm, Geologic Names Committee Secretary.

Asterisk (*) indicates usage by the U.S. Geological Survey. Other usages by state geological surveys.

"No current usage" (†) implies that a name has been abandoned or has fallen into disuse. Former usage and, if known, replacement name given in parentheses ( ).

Slash (/) indicates name does not conform with nomenclatural guidelines (CSN, 1933; ACSN, 1961, 1970; NACSN, 1983, 2005). This may be explained within brackets ([ ]).