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National Geologic Map Database
Geologic Unit: Somerville
Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Somerville slate
  • Modifications:
    • Original reference
  • Dominant lithology:
    • Slate
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • New England province
Publication:

Mansfield, G.R., 1906, The origin and structure of the Roxbury conglomerate: Harvard College, Museum of Comparative Zoology Bulletin, v. 49, no. 4, p. 91-271.


Summary:

Pg. 196-197. Somerville slate. Is litholgically similar to recognized Cambrian slates of the [Boston] region and markedly disimilar to known Carboniferous rocks of neighboring areas, especially to those of Narragansett Basin.
Occurs at and around Somerville, Middlesex Co., eastern MA.

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 896, p. 2026).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Somerville slates
  • Modifications:
    • Revised
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • New England province
Publication:

Lahee, F.H., 1914, Late Paleozoic glaciation in the Boston basin, Massachusetts: American Journal of Science, 4th series, v. 37, no. 220, p. 316-318.


Summary:

Pg. 316. Somerville slates, 2,300 feet thick, grade into underlying Sqantum tillite of Roxbury conglomerate through transition beds of shales or slates, sandstones, and conglomerates 200 to 300 feet thick. [Age is Carboniferous or Devonian.]

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 896, p. 2026).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Somerville slate‚Ć
  • Modifications:
    • Abandoned
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • New England province
    • Deerfield basin
Publication:

Emerson, B.K., 1917, Geology of Massachusetts and Rhode Island: U.S. Geological Survey Bulletin, 597, 289 p.


Summary:

†Somerville slate. Mapped the rocks at and around Somerville, Massachusetts, as Cambridge slate and the name "Somerville slate" has been discarded.

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 896, p. 2026).


For more information, please contact Nancy Stamm, Geologic Names Committee Secretary.

Asterisk (*) indicates published by U.S. Geological Survey authors.

"No current usage" (†) implies that a name has been abandoned or has fallen into disuse. Former usage and, if known, replacement name given in parentheses ( ).

Slash (/) indicates name conflicts with nomenclatural guidelines (CSN, 1933; ACSN, 1961, 1970; NACSN, 1983, 2005, 2021). May be explained within brackets ([ ]).