U.S. Geological Survey Home AASG Logo USGS HOME CONTACT USGS SEARCH USGS
National Geologic Map Database
Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Rocky Ridge sandstone member*
  • Modifications:
    • Original reference
  • Dominant lithology:
    • Sandstone
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Appalachian basin
Publication:

Butts, Charles, 1926, The Paleozoic rocks, IN Adams, G.I., and others, Geology of Alabama: Geological Survey of Alabama Special Report, no. 14, p. 41-230.


Summary:

Also USGS Geol. Atlas of the US, Bessemer-Vandiver folio, no. 221, 1927. Rocky Ridge sandstone member of Pottsville formation. Thick-bedded conglomeratic quartzose sandstone, 50 to 100 feet thick. A member of Pottsville formation in Cahaba field, lying about 3,000 feet above base of Pottsville. Recognized only in Little Cahaba syncline. Lies about 900 feet below Straven conglomerate member and about 2,760 feet above Chestnut sandstone member. Age is Pennsylvanian.
[Named for fact it forms Rocky Ridge, east and northeast of Cahaba pumping station, in T. 18 S., R. 2 W., northwestern part of Vandiver quadrangle, Jefferson Co., north-central AL.]

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 896, p. 1837).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Rocky Ridge Sandstone Member*
  • Modifications:
    • Overview
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Appalachian basin
Publication:

Raymond, D.E., Osborne, W.E., Copeland, C.W., and Neathery, T.L., 1988, Alabama stratigraphy: Geological Survey of Alabama Circular, no. 140, 97 p.


Summary:

Pg. 75. Rocky Ridge Sandstone Member of Pottsville Formation. A thick-bedded conglomeratic quartzose sandstone about 50 to 100 feet thick that lies about 2,400 feet above the Chestnut Sandstone Member and about 3,000 feet above the Pine Sandstone Member in the interval between the Buck and Pump coal beds of the Pottsville Formation in the Cahaba coal field, southern Valley and Ridge. [Age is Early Pennsylvanian (Morrowan).]
See also Charles Butts, 1927, USGS Geol. Atlas of the US, Bessemer-Vandiver folio, no. 221, p. 14; W.C. Culbertson, 1964, USGS Bull. 1182-B, p. B36.

Source: Publication.


For more information, please contact Nancy Stamm, Geologic Names Committee Secretary.

Asterisk (*) indicates usage by the U.S. Geological Survey. Other usages by state geological surveys.

"No current usage" (†) implies that a name has been abandoned or has fallen into disuse. Former usage and, if known, replacement name given in parentheses ( ).

Slash (/) indicates name does not conform with nomenclatural guidelines (CSN, 1933; ACSN, 1961, 1970; NACSN, 1983, 2005). This may be explained within brackets ([ ]).