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National Geologic Map Database
Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Rocky Gap sandstone
  • Modifications:
    • Named
  • Dominant lithology:
    • Sandstone
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Appalachian basin
Publication:

Swartz, F.M., 1929, The Helderberg group from central Pennsylvania to southwestern Virginia: Pennsylvania Academy of Science Proceedings, v. 3, p. 75-89.


Summary:

Rocky Gap sandstone named. Shown on diagrammatic cross section as about 60 ft of calcareous sandstone and conglomeratic sandstone.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Rocky Gap Sandstone*
  • Modifications:
    • Overview
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Appalachian basin
Publication:

McDowell, R.C., and Schultz, A.P., 1990, Stratigraphic and structural framework of the Giles County area, a part of the Appalachian basin of Virginia and West Virginia, IN Evolution of sedimentary basins; Appalachian basin: U.S. Geological Survey Bulletin, 1839-E, p. E1-E24.


Summary:

Rocky Gap Sandstone of Swartz (1929) adopted for use by U. S. Geological Survey. "The Rocky Gap is composed of light-brown, medium- to coarse-grained, cross-bedded calcareous sandstone with vuggy molds of brachiopods and crinoids. Cross beds are large scale, planar. Iron and manganese streaks, blebs, and stains are common * * * formation averages 65 to 75 ft in thickness * * *." Underlain by Tonoloway Limestone and overlain by Huntersville Chert.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


For more information, please contact Nancy Stamm, Geologic Names Committee Secretary.

Asterisk (*) indicates usage by the U.S. Geological Survey. Other usages by state geological surveys.

"No current usage" (†) implies that a name has been abandoned or has fallen into disuse. Former usage and, if known, replacement name given in parentheses ( ).

Slash (/) indicates name does not conform with nomenclatural guidelines (CSN, 1933; ACSN, 1961, 1970; NACSN, 1983, 2005). This may be explained within brackets ([ ]).