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Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Phenix City Gneiss
  • Modifications:
    • Named
  • Dominant lithology:
    • Gneiss
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Piedmont-Blue Ridge province
Publication:

Bentley, R.D. (editor), and Neathery, T.L. (editor), 1970, Geology of the Brevard fault zone and related rocks of the Inner Piedmont of Alabama: Alabama Geological Society Annual Field Trip Guidebook, December 4-5, 1970, no. 8, 119 p.


Summary:

Named as part of Uchee Complex (new name) within Uchee block of AL Piedmont. Named for Phenix City, Russell Co., east-central AL. Type locality is excellent exposures on Chattahoochee River at Phenix City. Consists of coarsely crystalline, highly contorted migmatite gneiss. Migmatite is composed of biotite-epidote quartz diorite gneiss, biotite-hornblende gneiss, and local epidote-biotite amphibolite. Characterized in places by large (2 in.) calcite crystals. Relationship to Moffits Mill Complex, also of Uchee block, is unclear due to poor preservation of rock and partial cover of contact area by Cretaceous sediments. Age is early Paleozoic.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Phenix City Gneiss
  • Modifications:
    • Overview
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Piedmont-Blue Ridge province
Publication:

Raymond, D.E., Osborne, W.E., Copeland, C.W., and Neathery, T.L., 1988, Alabama stratigraphy: Geological Survey of Alabama Circular, no. 140, 97 p.


Summary:

Type locality refined as exposures at Rocky Shoals on Chattahoochee River at Phenix City.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Phenix City Gneiss
  • Modifications:
    • Overview
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Piedmont-Blue Ridge province
Publication:

Steltenpohl, M.G., and Kunk, M.J., 1993, 40Ar/39Ar thermochronology and Alleghanian development of the southernmost Appalachian Piedmont, Alabama and southwest Georgia: Geological Society of America Bulletin, v. 105, no. 6, p. 819-833.


Summary:

Authors follow terminology of Bentley and Neathery (1970) for this report. Uchee Complex of the Uchee belt consists of Mulberry Gneiss, Phenix City Gneiss, informal Standing Boy quartz diorite (combined with Phenix City Gneiss in figures) and informal Hudson Rapids Amphibolite (combined with other amphibolites in figures). Age is early Paleozoic. Report includes geologic sketch map. [Remark reflects published version. GNU review requested inverted usage for informal terms, but request was not followed by authors. Mulberry Standing Boy, and Hudson Rapids units should remain informal terms.]

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Phenix City Gneiss*
  • Modifications:
    • Age modified
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Piedmont-Blue Ridge province
Publication:

Rankin, D.W., 1994, Continental margin of the eastern United States; past and present, IN Speed, R.C., ed., Phanerozoic evolution of North American continent-ocean transitions: Geological Society of America, The Decade of North American Geology (DNAG), Continent-Ocean Transect Series, p. 129-218.


Summary:

Age of Phenix City Gneiss is Late Proterozoic and Early Cambrian based on radiometric ages cited by G.S. Russell (1985, Reconnaissance geochronological investigations of the Phenix City Gneiss and Bartletts Ferry mylonite zone, IN Kish, S.A., Hanley, T.B., and Schamel, S., eds., Geology of the southwestern Piedmont of Georgia: Tallahassee, Florida State University, Department of Geology, p. 9-11.).

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


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For more information, please contact Nancy Stamm, Geologic Names Committee Secretary.

Asterisk (*) indicates usage by the U.S. Geological Survey. Other usages by state geological surveys.

"No current usage" (†) implies that a name has been abandoned or has fallen into disuse. Former usage and, if known, replacement name given in parentheses ( ).

Slash (/) indicates name does not conform with nomenclatural guidelines (CSN, 1933; ACSN, 1961, 1970; NACSN, 1983, 2005). This may be explained within brackets ([ ]).