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National Geologic Map Database
Geologic Unit: Mobile
Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Mobile Clay
  • Modifications:
    • Named
  • Dominant lithology:
    • Clay
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Mid-Gulf Coast basin
Publication:

Isphording, W.C., 1977, Petrology and stratigraphy of the Alabama Miocene: Gulf Coast Association of Geological Societies Transactions, v. 27, p. 304-313.


Summary:

Mobile Clay named in Mobile Co., southwestern AL, where it is exposed along the Mobile River and nearby highways and in gravel pits. Unit consists of dark-green, lavender, gray, and brassy-yellow clay. It is a laminated to massive, fossiliferous, marine and transitional-marine deposit. Thickness less than 450 m. Overlies Chickasawhay Limestone or (downdip to south) the Tampa Limestone; underlies Ecor Rouge Sand. Age is middle Miocene.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Mobile
  • Modifications:
    • Not used
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Mid-Gulf Coast basin
Publication:

Raymond, D.E., Osborne, W.E., Copeland, C.W., and Neathery, T.L., 1988, Alabama stratigraphy: Geological Survey of Alabama Circular, no. 140, 97 p.


Summary:

Mobile Clay is apparently not considered formal AL State usage as it is not listed in this compilation. The Miocene in AL is undifferentiated in this report, except for the Pensacola Clay in the southwest subsurface.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


For more information, please contact Nancy Stamm, Geologic Names Committee Secretary.

Asterisk (*) indicates usage by the U.S. Geological Survey. Other usages by state geological surveys.

"No current usage" (†) implies that a name has been abandoned or has fallen into disuse. Former usage and, if known, replacement name given in parentheses ( ).

Slash (/) indicates name does not conform with nomenclatural guidelines (CSN, 1933; ACSN, 1961, 1970; NACSN, 1983, 2005). This may be explained within brackets ([ ]).