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National Geologic Map Database
Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • House Springs K-Bentonite Bed
  • Modifications:
    • Named
  • Dominant lithology:
    • Bentonite
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Ozark uplift
Publication:

Kolata, D.R., Frost, J.K., and Huff, W.R., 1986, K-bentonites of the Ordovician Decorah subgroup, Upper Mississippi Valley; correlation by chemical fingerprinting: Illinois Geological Survey Circular, no. 537, 30 p.


Summary:

House Springs K-Bentonite Bed of Dunleith Formation of Kimmswick subgroup [informal] of Galena Group. Composed of bentonite. Thickness is 1 to 3 cm. Commonly overlain by about 15 cm of argillaceous limestone. Age is Middle Ordovician (Champlainian, Kirkfieldian). Report includes cross sections, stratigraphic sections.
Named for town of House Springs, Jefferson Co., eastern MO.
["Subgroup" not recognized as a formal stratigraphic rank term (CSN, 1933; ACSN, 1961, 1970; NACSN, 1983, 2005). Considered informal and should not be capitalized.]

Source: Modified from GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • House Springs Bentonite Bed*
  • Modifications:
    • Revised
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Ozark uplift
Publication:

Harrison, R.W., 1997, Bedrock geologic map of the St. Louis 30' x 60' quadrangle, Missouri and Illinois: U.S. Geological Survey Miscellaneous Investigations Series Map, I-2533, 2 sheets, 7 p., scale 1:100,000 [http://ngmdb.usgs.gov/Prodesc/proddesc_13024.htm]


Summary:

Revised as House Springs Bentonite Bed of Kimmswick Limestone, but follows definition of Kolata and others (1986). Located about 3 ft (1 m) above base of Kimmswick.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


For more information, please contact Nancy Stamm, Geologic Names Committee Secretary.

Asterisk (*) indicates usage by the U.S. Geological Survey. Other usages by state geological surveys.

"No current usage" (†) implies that a name has been abandoned or has fallen into disuse. Former usage and, if known, replacement name given in parentheses ( ).

Slash (/) indicates name does not conform with nomenclatural guidelines (CSN, 1933; ACSN, 1961, 1970; NACSN, 1983, 2005). This may be explained within brackets ([ ]).