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National Geologic Map Database
Geologic Unit: Holdenville
Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Holdenville shale*
  • Modifications:
    • Original reference
  • Dominant lithology:
    • Shale
    • Limestone
    • Sandstone
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Chautauqua platform
Publication:

Taff, J.A., 1901, Coalgate folio, Indian Territory: U.S. Geological Survey Geologic Atlas of the United States Folio, GF-74, 6 p., scale 1:125,000


Summary:

Holdenville shale. Blue and yellow clay shale, with thin siliceous limestones and sandstones, 260 feet thick. Underlies Seminole conglomerate and overlies Wewoka formation. [Age is Pennsylvanian.]
Named from Holdenville, which is located on the shale, in Hughes Co., central OK.

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 896, p. 968).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Holdenville formation
  • Modifications:
    • Revised
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Chautauqua platform
    • Arkoma basin
Publication:

Morgan, G.D., 1924, Geology of the Stonewall quadrangle, Oklahoma: [Oklahoma] Bureau of Geology Bulletin, no. 2, 248 p., Columbia Univ., Dept. Geol. Contrib. PhD dissert


Summary:

Holdenville formation. In Pontotoc and Seminole Counties, central southern Oklahoma, includes (descending) Sasakwa limestone and Homer limestone members. Age is Pennsylvanian.

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 896, Homer entry p. 973, Sasakwa entry p. 1930).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Holdenville shale
  • Modifications:
    • Areal extent
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Chautauqua platform
Publication:

Oakes, M.C., 1952, Geology and mineral resources of Tulsa County, Oklahoma (includes parts of adjacent counties), with sections on oil and gas by G.S. Dille, and water resources by J.H. Warren: Oklahoma Geological Survey Bulletin, no. 69, 234 p., (incl. geologic map)


Summary:

Pg. 42-47, pl. 11. Holdenville shale. Memorial shale, by definition, extends upward from top of Lenapah limestone to base of Seminole formaiton, and, likewise, Holdenville shale extends upward from top of Wewoka to base of Seminole. As Lenapah has been traced into uppermost Wewoka, the Memorial and Holdenville lie between same stratigraphic limits and are equivalent. Holdenville has priority and is commonly used term. Thickness 40 to 200 feet in Tulsa County. Includes Sasakwa and Homer limestone [members]. In northern Oklahoma and in Kansas, unit occurs in thin ragged patches. Age is Middle Pennsylvanian (Des Moines).

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 1200, p. 1779).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Holdenville formation
  • Modifications:
    • Areal extent
Publication:

Howe, W.B., 1953, Upper Marmaton strata in western and northern Missouri: Missouri Division of Geological Survey and Water Resources Report of Investigations, no. 9, 29 p.


Summary:

Pg. 14-16. Holdenville formation. Uppermost formation in Marmaton group. Lies between Lenapah formation and base of Hepler sandstone, basal Pleasanton, of Missouri series. Term Memorial, formerly applied to post-Lenapah, pre-Pleasanton beds in Missouri, has been dropped. Use of name Holdenville follows recent work by Oklahoma Geol. Survey. Formation in western Missouri is predominantly gray shale. Thickness 0 to at least 15 feet. Age is Middle Pennsylvanian (Des Moines).

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 1200, p. 1779).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Holdenville shale*
  • Modifications:
    • Overview
Publication:

Jewett, J.M., 1959, Graphic column and classification of rocks in Kansas: Kansas Geological Survey


Summary:

Holdenville shale of Marmaton group. Shown on chart at top of Marmaton group. Overlies Lenapah limestone; underlies Hepler sandstone. Age is Middle Pennsylvanian (Des Moines).

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 1200, p. 1779).


For more information, please contact Nancy Stamm, Geologic Names Committee Secretary.

Asterisk (*) indicates published by U.S. Geological Survey authors.

"No current usage" (†) implies that a name has been abandoned or has fallen into disuse. Former usage and, if known, replacement name given in parentheses ( ).

Slash (/) indicates name does not conform with nomenclatural guidelines (CSN, 1933; ACSN, 1961, 1970; NACSN, 1983, 2005). This may be explained within brackets ([ ]).