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Geologic Unit: Hepler
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Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Hepler sandstone
  • Modifications:
    • Original reference
  • Dominant lithology:
    • Sandstone
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Cherokee basin
    • Forest City basin
Publication:

Jewett, J.M., 1940, Oil and gas in Linn County, Kansas: Kansas Geological Survey Bulletin, no. 30, 29 p.


Summary:

Pg. 8-9, fig. 2. Hepler sandstone. A persistent sandstone, at base of Bourbon group generally not more than 3 or 4 feet thick but as much as 20 feet thick north of Pleasanton, Linn County, eastern Kansas, where it is asphalt bearing. Conformably underlies gray, yellow, and black shale; disconformably overlies upper layers of Marmaton group. Columnar section shows the Hepler overlying Memorial shale. Age is Late Pennsylvanian (Missourian).
Type exposure: in center sec. 14, T. 27 S., R. 22 E., 1.5 mi north of Hepler, Bourbon Co., eastern KS.

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 1200, p. 1736-1737).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Hepler sandstone
  • Modifications:
    • Revised
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Cherokee basin
    • Forest City basin
Publication:

Moore, R.C., 1949, Divisions of the Pennsylvanian System in Kansas: Kansas Geological Survey Bulletin, no. 83, 203 p.


Summary:

Pg. 73; R.C. Moore and others, 1951, Kansas Geol. Survey Bull., no. 89, p. 91. Hepler sandstone. Reallocated to Pleasanton group which replaces Bourbon group (suppressed).

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 1200, p. 1736-1737).


For more information, please contact Nancy Stamm, Geologic Names Committee Secretary.

Asterisk (*) indicates published by U.S. Geological Survey authors.

"No current usage" (†) implies that a name has been abandoned or has fallen into disuse. Former usage and, if known, replacement name given in parentheses ( ).

Slash (/) indicates name does not conform with nomenclatural guidelines (CSN, 1933; ACSN, 1961, 1970; NACSN, 1983, 2005). This may be explained within brackets ([ ]).