U.S. Geological Survey Home AASG Logo USGS HOME CONTACT USGS SEARCH USGS
National Geologic Map Database
Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Grand Island formation
  • Modifications:
    • Original reference
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Salina basin
Publication:

Lugn, A.L., and Condra, G.E., 1932, Pleistocene formations of southern Nebraska [abs.]: Geological Society of America Bulletin, Geological Society of America, Cordilleran Section, 30th annual meeting, Pasadena, CA, March 6-7, 1931, v. 43, no. 1, p. 190.


Summary:

Pg. 190. Grand Island formation (Kansan), 50 to 100+ feet thick, lies unconformably on Fullerton bed, and is conformably overlain by Upland formation (Yarmouth).
Named from exposures at and around Grand Island, Hall Co., southeastern NE.

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 896, p. 853).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Grand Island formation
  • Modifications:
    • Areal extent
  • Dominant lithology:
    • Sand
    • Gravel
Publication:

Lugn, A.L., 1934, The geology and mammalian fauna of the Pleistocene of Nebraska; Part 1, Outline of Pleistocene geology of Nebraska: Nebraska State Museum Bulletin, v. 1, no. 41, p. 319-356., See also Nebraska Geol. Survey Bull., no. 10, 223 p., 1935


Summary:

Pg. 326, 343-346. Grand Island formation. Largely fluvial inwash-outwash deposits of sand and gravel, fine and coarse, of Kansan age (Pleistocene). Thickness 30 to 150 feet. Upper 30 to 50 feet are usually fine sand. In a section northwest of Holdrege it is 120 feet thick, and upper 100 feet is clean fine to medium sand and lower 20 feet is mixed sand and gravel. Extends continuously under Platte River Valley and plains to north and south, covering 15,000+/- sq mi.

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 896, p. 853).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Grand Island member
  • Modifications:
    • Revised
Publication:

Frye, J.C., Swineford, Ada, and Leonard, A. Byron, 1948, Correlation of Pleistocene deposits of the central Great Plains with the glacial section: Journal of Geology, v. 56, no. 6, p. 501-525.


Summary:

Pg. 520 (fig. 3), 521, 522; R.C. Moore and others, 1951, Kansas Geol. Survey Bull., no. 89, p. 15. Grand Island member of Meade formation. Lower member of Meade formation in Kansas. Underlies Sappa member. Thickness commonly 25 feet. Age is Pleistocene (late Kansan).

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 1200, p. 1566).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Grand Island sand and gravel formation
  • Modifications:
    • Revised
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Iowa shelf
Publication:

Condra, G.E., Reed, E.C., and Gordon, E.D., 1950, Correlation of the Pleistocene deposits of Nebraska: Nebraska Geological Survey Bulletin, no. 15-A, 74 p.


Summary:

Pg. 12 (fig. 6). Grand Island sand and gravel formation. Correlation table shows relation of Nebraska Pleistocene formations to continental glaciations on cyclic basis involving erosion, alluviation, eolation, and soil formation. Grand Island sand and gravel (Kansan) divided into "Upper Grand Island" and "Lower Grand Island." Thickness of Upper Grand Island about 28 feet in Little Sioux Valley, near Harrison-Monona County line, Iowa.

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 1200, p. 1566).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Grand Island sand and gravel formation
  • Modifications:
    • Revised
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Iowa shelf
Publication:

Schultz, C.B., Reed, E.C., and Lugn, A.L., 1951, The Red Cloud sand and gravel, a new Pleistocene formation in Nebraska: Science, v. 114, no. 2969, p. 547-549.


Summary:

Grand Island sand and gravel formation. Proposed that name Grand Island be restricted to Upper Grand Island, and name Red Cloud sand and gravel be applied to Lower Grand Island of Condra and Reed (1950), which includes pro-Kansan sand and gravel. The restricted Grand Island was deposited during retreat and waning of Kansas ice sheet (late Kansan and early Yarmouth Sappa time).

Source: Publication; US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 1200, p. 1566).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Grand Island formation
  • Modifications:
    • Areal extent
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Denver basin
    • Chadron arch
Publication:

Hill, D.R., and Tompkin, J.M., 1953, General and engineering geology of the Wray area, Colorado and Nebraska: U.S. Geological Survey Bulletin, 1001, 61 p.


Summary:

Pg. 9 (table 1), 23-24. Grand Island formation. Geographically extended into Wray area, in eastern Yuma County, eastern Colorado, and southwestern Dundy County, southwestern Nebraska. Does not crop out in natural exposures. Thickness about 10 feet, measured in gravel pits. Overlies Ogallala formation. Age is Pleistocene (Kansan).

Source: Publication; US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 1200, p. 1566).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Grand Island member
  • Modifications:
    • Revised
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Anadarko basin
Publication:

Hibbard, C.W., 1958, New stratigraphic names for early Pleistocene deposits in southwestern Kansas: American Journal of Science, v. 256, no. 1, p. 54-59.


Summary:

Pg. 55 (fig. 1). Chart of revised classification of Kansas Pleistocene shows Grand Island as member of unnamed formation in Meade group. [Age is Pleistocene (Kansan).]

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 1200, p. 1566).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Grand Island formation
  • Modifications:
    • Overview
Publication:

Jewett, J.M., 1959, Graphic column and classification of rocks in Kansas: Kansas Geological Survey


Summary:

Shown as formation in Kansas.

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 1200, p. 1566).


Search archives

For more information, please contact Nancy Stamm, Geologic Names Committee Secretary.

Asterisk (*) indicates published by U.S. Geological Survey authors.

"No current usage" (†) implies that a name has been abandoned or has fallen into disuse. Former usage and, if known, replacement name given in parentheses ( ).

Slash (/) indicates name does not conform with nomenclatural guidelines (CSN, 1933; ACSN, 1961, 1970; NACSN, 1983, 2005). This may be explained within brackets ([ ]).