U.S. Geological Survey Home AASG Logo USGS HOME CONTACT USGS SEARCH USGS
National Geologic Map Database
Geologic Unit: Gage
Search archives
Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Gage shale member
  • Modifications:
    • Original reference
  • Dominant lithology:
    • Shale
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Nemaha anticline
Publication:

Condra, G.E., and Upp, J.E., 1931, Correlation of the Big Blue series in Nebraska: Nebraska Geological Survey Bulletin, 2nd series, no. 6, 74 p., See also "Modern classifications of the Permian rocks of Kansas and Nebraska," compiled by M.G. Wilmarth, Secretary of Committee on Geologic Names, USGS unpub. corr. chart, Oct. 1936, 1 sheet


Summary:

Pg. 45. Gage shale. Top member of Doyle formation of Chase group. Consists of shales, of alternating gray, greenish-gray, and chocolate red colors. Thickness increases from 28 feet in Nebraska to 50 feet in southern Kansas. Overlies Towanda limestone member of Doyle and underlies Stovall limestone member of Winfield formation of Chase group. Age is Permian (Big Blue).
Type locality: between 1 and 2 mi south of west side of Wymore, southeastern NE. Named from Gage Co., southeastern NE.

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 896, p. 789); GNC KS-NE Permian Corr. Chart, Oct. 1936.


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Gage shale member
  • Modifications:
    • Overview
Publication:

Moore, R.C., Frye, J.C., Jewett, J.M., Lee, Wallace, and O'Connor, H.G., 1951, The Kansas rock column: Kansas Geological Survey Bulletin, no. 89, 132 p.


Summary:

Pg. 44. Gage shale member of Doyle shale. As currently defined, consists mostly of clayey shale with calcareous fossiliferous shale and a minor amount of limestone in upper part; lower and middle parts are chiefly varicolored noncalcareous shale consisting of red, green, purple, and chocolate-colored zones interbedded with gray and yellow layers. Thickness approx. 45 feet. Overlies Towanda limestone member of Doyle; underlies Stovall limestone member of Winfield limestone.

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 1200, p. 1450).


For more information, please contact Nancy Stamm, Geologic Names Committee Secretary.

Asterisk (*) indicates published by U.S. Geological Survey authors.

"No current usage" (†) implies that a name has been abandoned or has fallen into disuse. Former usage and, if known, replacement name given in parentheses ( ).

Slash (/) indicates name does not conform with nomenclatural guidelines (CSN, 1933; ACSN, 1961, 1970; NACSN, 1983, 2005). This may be explained within brackets ([ ]).