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National Geologic Map Database
Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Fork Mountain slate
  • Modifications:
    • Original reference
  • Dominant lithology:
    • Slate
    • Quartzite
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Ouachita folded belt
Publication:

Purdue, A.H., 1909, The slates of Arkansas: Arkansas Geological Survey, p. 1-95, (incl. geologic map)


Summary:

Pg. 30, 40 and 1914 (USGS Bull. 586). Fork Mountain slate. Gray to greenish and chocolate-colored slates, containing thin layers of quartzite in lower part; much jointed, but withstands weathering, and usually forms a bluff where it outcrops on mountain side. Overlies Arkansas novaculite and unconformably underlies Stanley shale. [Age is Pennsylvanian.]
[Named from Fork Mountain, Polk Co., southwestern AR.]

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 896, p. 753).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Fork Mountain slate
  • Modifications:
    • Abandoned
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Ouachita folded belt
Publication:

Miser, H.D., 1918, Manganese deposits of the Caddo Gap and De Queen quadrangles, Arkansas, IN Contributions to economic geology (short papers and preliminary reports), 1917; Part 1, Metals and nonmetals except fuels: U.S. Geological Survey Bulletin, 660-C, p. C59-C122.


Summary:

Pg. 66. Some shale at base of Stanley shale has in places been altered to slate, to which the name "Fork Mountain slate" has been earlier applied. [This name has been discarded. The beds are only a local facies of Stanley shale.]

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 896, p. 753).


For more information, please contact Nancy Stamm, Geologic Names Committee Secretary.

Asterisk (*) indicates usage by the U.S. Geological Survey. Other usages by state geological surveys.

"No current usage" (†) implies that a name has been abandoned or has fallen into disuse. Former usage and, if known, replacement name given in parentheses ( ).

Slash (/) indicates name does not conform with nomenclatural guidelines (CSN, 1933; ACSN, 1961, 1970; NACSN, 1983, 2005). This may be explained within brackets ([ ]).