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National Geologic Map Database
Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Ellisville granodiorite
  • Modifications:
    • First used
  • Dominant lithology:
    • Granodiorite
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Piedmont-Blue Ridge province
Publication:

Hopkins, H.R., 1961, Geology of western Louisa County, Virginia: Dissertation Abstracts, v. 21, no. 7, p. 1912.


Summary:

In western Louisa Co., VA, Green Springs diorite and Ellisville granodiorite (both new) were intruded into sedimentary rocks during or immediately following major deformation of probable Mississippian age.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Ellisville biotite granodiorite
  • Modifications:
    • Overview
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Piedmont-Blue Ridge province
Publication:

Rader, E.K., and Evans, N.H., 1993, Geologic map of Virginia; expanded explanation: Virginia Division of Mineral Resources, 80 p.


Summary:

Use of term Ellisville biotite granodiorite follows nomenclature of Pavlides (1990: USGS Open-File 90-548). Ellisville intrudes melange zones II and III of the Mine Run complex in central VA. Described as mesocratic, coarse- to medium-grained, equigranular to porphyritic, massive to strongly foliated granodiorite. Predominant minerals are quartz, plagioclase, potassium feldspar, and biotite. Accessories include epidote, allanite, titanite, and apatite. K-feldspar megacrysts up to 1.5 cm across occur in porphyritic rocks. Rb-Sr whole-rock date is 440+/-8 Ma (Pavlides and others, 1982).

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


For more information, please contact Nancy Stamm, Geologic Names Committee Secretary.

Asterisk (*) indicates published by U.S. Geological Survey authors.

"No current usage" (†) implies that a name has been abandoned or has fallen into disuse. Former usage and, if known, replacement name given in parentheses ( ).

Slash (/) indicates name does not conform with nomenclatural guidelines (CSN, 1933; ACSN, 1961, 1970; NACSN, 1983, 2005). This may be explained within brackets ([ ]).