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Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Cragford Schist
  • Modifications:
    • Original reference
  • Dominant lithology:
    • Schist
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Piedmont-Blue Ridge province
Publication:

Bentley, R.D. (editor), and Neathery, T.L. (editor), 1970, Geology of the Brevard fault zone and related rocks of the Inner Piedmont of Alabama: Alabama Geological Society Annual Field Trip Guidebook, December 4-5, 1970, no. 8, 119 p.


Summary:

The Wedowee is here raised from Formation to Group rank and divided into the Hackneyville spotted Schist, the Cragford Schist, and two unnamed metasedimentary sequences. The Cragford is a fine-grained sericite and garnet-sericite schist, particularly well developed near Cragford, Clay Co., AL. Unit is generally thinly foliated and contains almandine-like garnets, usually no larger than 5 mm. Distribution of the Cragford is irregular. Weathering characteristics and saprolite development vary according to the garnet content.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Cragford Phyllite
  • Modifications:
    • Principal reference
  • Dominant lithology:
    • Phyllite
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Piedmont-Blue Ridge province
Publication:

Neathery, T.L., and Reynolds, J.W., 1975, Geology of the Lineville East, Ofelia, Wadley North, and Mellow Valley quadrangles, Alabama: Geological Survey of Alabama Bulletin, no. 109, p. 1-120.


Summary:

Cragford Schist, introduced by Bentley and Neathery (1970), is here formally named the Cragford Phyllite. Unit consists of rhythmically bedded graphite-chlorite-sericite phyllite and schist. Overlies Hillabee Chlorite Schist; underlies Cutnose Formation or Hackneyville Schist, both of Wedowee Group and formally proposed in this report.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Cragford Phyllite
  • Modifications:
    • Overview
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Piedmont-Blue Ridge province
Publication:

Raymond, D.E., Osborne, W.E., Copeland, C.W., and Neathery, T.L., 1988, Alabama stratigraphy: Geological Survey of Alabama Circular, no. 140, 97 p.


Summary:

Cragford Phyllite of Wedowee Group, as used by the Geological Survey of Alabama, consists of interbedded fine-grained graphite-chlorite-sericite schist and phyllite, garnet-sericite schist and phyllite, and graphite-quartz-sericite phyllite, with occasional thin beds of fine-grained feldspathic biotite gneiss, and locally thin interbeds of calc-silicate rock and quartzite. Generalized age of Precambrian to Paleozoic assigned to all metamorphic rocks of the Northern Piedmont of east-central AL.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Cragford Phyllite
  • Modifications:
    • Revised
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Piedmont-Blue Ridge province
Publication:

Guthrie, G.M., and Dean, L.S., 1989, Geology of the New Site 7.5-minute quadrangle, Tallapoosa and Clay Counties, Alabama (text): Geological Survey of Alabama Quadrangle Map Series, 9, 2 sheets, 41 p., scale 1:24,000


Summary:

Dominant lithologies in the Cragford are dark-green to black fine-grained biotite chlorite sericite phyllite, graphite sericite phyllite, and tan fine-grained quartzite and metasiltstone. Typical exposures occur along light-duty roads and creeks in the northeast corner of T24N, R22E. Within the typical Cragford is a sequence of biotite quartzite, here referred to informally as the Enitachopco Creek quartzite member, which measures 428 ft thick in its type area in Tallapoosa Co.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


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For more information, please contact Nancy Stamm, Geologic Names Committee Secretary.

Asterisk (*) indicates usage by the U.S. Geological Survey. Other usages by state geological surveys.

"No current usage" (†) implies that a name has been abandoned or has fallen into disuse. Former usage and, if known, replacement name given in parentheses ( ).

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