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  • Usage in publication:
    • Connoquenessing sandstone
  • Modifications:
    • Named
  • Dominant lithology:
    • Sandstone
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Appalachian basin
Publication:

White, I.C., 1878, Report of progress in the Beaver River district of the bituminous coal fields of western Pennsylvania, with analyses of coal, cannel, coke, clay, limestone, and ore, from Butler and Beaver Counties, Pennsylvania by A.S. McCreath: Pennsylvania Geological Survey Report of Progress, 2nd series, v. Q, 337 p.


Summary:

Named Connoquenessing sandstone, Upper Connoquenessing sandstone, and Lower Connoquenessing sandstone. Named for Connoquenessing Creek, Lawrence Co., western PA. Connoquenessing sandstone consists of (descending) very massive, hard, white sandstone, 40 to 50 ft thick; dark sandy shales generally containing iron ore a t top and in some places a thin coal below, 40 to 50 ft thick; and hard, massive, grayish-brown sandstone, 20 to 25 ft thick. Overlies Sharon shales; lies 20 to 80 ft below Upper Homewood sandstone. Upper Connoquenessing sandstone forms upper cliff along Connoquenessing Creek between its mouth and Slippery Rock. Lower Connoquenessing sandstone is frequently seen along bed of Connoquenessing Creek. [Age is Pennsylvanian.]

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


For more information, please contact Nancy Stamm, Geologic Names Committee Secretary.

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