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Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Chambersburg limestone*
  • Modifications:
    • Named
  • Dominant lithology:
    • Limestone
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Appalachian basin
Publication:

Stose, G.W., 1906, Sedimentary rocks of South Mountain, Pennsylvania: Journal of Geology, v. 14, p. 201-220.


Summary:

Named Chambersburg limestone for Chambersburg, Franklin Co., PA. Consists of dark crystalline limestone at base with shaly or argillaceous limestone in upper part. Upper part is fossiliferous containing Chazyan and Blackriveran faunas (as identified by E.O. Ulrich). Unit is more than 1000 feet thick. Overlies Stones River limestone and underlies Martinsburg group. The Chambersburg is of Middle Ordovician age.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Chambersburg limestone*
  • Modifications:
    • Overview
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Appalachian basin
Publication:

Stose, G.W., 1909, Description of the Mercersburg-Chambersburg district, Pennsylvania: U.S. Geological Survey Geologic Atlas of the United States Folio, Mercersburg-Chambersburg folio, no. 170, 19 p.


Summary:

The Chambersburg limestone is characterized by fossiliferous, thin-bedded limestones with argillaceous partings. Thickness varies along strike from a maximum of 750 feet in the Chambersburg belt to about 100 feet in McConnellsburg Cove. This folio contains abundant fossil information. The unit is thin-bedded, tough dark limestone, usually very fossiliferous, with irregular clayey partings giving rise to limestone "cobble" on weathering. Contains interbedded shale at top of formation in most places that forms a transition into the overlying Martinsburg.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Chambersburg limestone*
  • Modifications:
    • Revised
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Appalachian basin
Publication:

Ulrich, E.O., 1911, Revision of the Paleozoic systems: Geological Society of America Bulletin, v. 22, p. 281-680.


Summary:

Pl. 27. Transferred to Martinsburg shale the shaly beds [0 to 245 feet thick] at top of Chambersburg limestone, thus including in the Martinsburg all beds of Trenton age. This modified definition was adopted by the USGS in 1927.

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 896, p. 395).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Chambersburg limestone
  • Modifications:
    • Revised
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Appalachian basin
Publication:

Butts, Charles, 1940, Geology of the Appalachian Valley in Virginia, Part 1: Virginia Geological Survey Bulletin, no. 52, 568 p.


Summary:

The Chambersburg limestone is revised to include only the part of the original Chambersburg overlying the Lowville equivalent. The thickness of the unit on Tumbling Run, 1-1/2 miles southwest of Strasburg, VA, is 563 feet. The Chambersburg overlies the Lenoir limestone and underlies the Martinsburg shale.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Chambersburg limestone
  • Modifications:
    • Revised
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Appalachian basin
Publication:

Craig, L.C., 1941, Middle Ordovician of the Chambersburg region, Pennsylvania [abs.]: Geological Society of America Bulletin, v. 52, no. 12, p. 1963-1964.


Summary:

The Chambersburg is divided into three formations with type sections 2 miles southwest of Marion, PA; (ascending) Shippensburg formation (500 feet of dark gray limestone, cobbly below and even-bedded above), Mercersburg formation (150 feet of dark gray, thin irregular and thick even-bedded limestone with a siltstone and metabentonite at base), and Greencastle formation (63 feet of black, massive limestone with thin basal calcarenite).

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Chambersburg limestone
  • Modifications:
    • Revised
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Appalachian basin
Publication:

Cooper, B.N., and Cooper, G.A., 1946, Lower Middle Ordovician stratigraphy of the Shenandoah Valley, Virginia: Geological Society of America Bulletin, v. 57, no. 1, p. 35-113.


Summary:

A new classification is proposed for the lower Middle Ordovician. The Lincolnshire limestone includes lower beds of Chambersburg limestone as identified by Butts (1940). The Edinburg formation corresponds to a substantial part of the Chambersburg of PA. The Oranda formation corresponds to the "CHRISTIANIA" [BIMURIA] bed of the Chambersburg of southern PA.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Chambersburg Limestone
  • Modifications:
    • Revised
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Appalachian basin
Publication:

Cardwell, D.H., Erwin, R.B., and Woodward, H.P., 1968, Geologic Map of West Virginia: West Virginia Geological and Economic Survey, scale 1:250,000


Summary:

On the State geologic map of WV, the Trenton Group is described to include the upper part of the Chambersburg Limestone in northeastern WV.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Chambersburg Formation
  • Modifications:
    • Overview
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Appalachian basin
Publication:

Root, S.I., 1968, Geology and mineral resources of southeastern Franklin County, Pennsylvania: Pennsylvania Geological Survey Topographic and Geologic Atlas, 4th series, 119cd, 118 p., scale 1:24,000


Summary:

In Franklin Co., PA, Chambersburg Formation consists of dark gray, cobbly limestone, argillaceous, with abundant irregular shaly partings. Some metabentonite beds are present. Unit has the characteristic of weathering to cobbles. This cobbly weathering is the result of wavy laminations or shaly partings that cross bedding at high angles. The Chambersburg is 750 feet thick.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Chambersburg Limestone
  • Modifications:
    • Overview
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Appalachian basin
Publication:

Nutter, L.J., 1973, Hydrogeology of the carbonate rocks, Frederick and Hagerstown Valleys, Maryland: Maryland Geological Survey Report of Investigations, no. 19, 70 p.


Summary:

The Chambersburg Limestone is exposed in narrow bands on both sides of the Martinsburg Shale outcrop belt in the Conococheague Creek valley. Unit is composed of dark-gray, fine- to medium-grained, thin-bedded argillaceous limestones. Thickness is 100-225 feet. The Chambersburg is characterized by sinkholes west of Conococheague Creek.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Chambersburg Formation
  • Modifications:
    • Overview
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Appalachian basin
Publication:

Geyer, A.R., and Wilshusen, J.P., 1982, Engineering characteristics of the rocks of Pennsylvania; environmental geology supplement to the State geologic map; 2nd edition, revised: Pennsylvania Geological Survey Environmental Geology Report, 4th series, no. 1, 300 p., Revision of McGlade, W.G., Geyer, A.R., and Wilshusen, J.P., 1972, "Engineering characteristics of the rocks of Pennsylvania," Pennsylvania Geol. Survey, 4th ser., Env. Geol. Rpt. EG 1, 200 p. (1st ed.)


Summary:

The Chambersburg Formation in PA consists of dark-gray limestone at the top, gray argillaceous limestone in the middle, and dark-gray cobbly limestone at the base. Unit only occurs southwest of the Susquehanna River. Its maximum thickness is about 770 feet. A reference section has been designated along spur of railroad northwest of Kauffman, in eastern Franklin Co. The unit is well bedded and is characteristically thin to flaggy. It is moderately resistant and weathers to a moderate depth.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Chambersburg Limestone*
  • Modifications:
    • Biostratigraphic dating
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Appalachian basin
Publication:

Harris, A.G., Stamm, N.R., Weary, D.J., Repetski, J.E., Stamm, R.G., and Parker, R.A., 1994, Conodont color alteration index (CAI) map and conodont-based age determinations for the Winchester 30' x 60' quadrangle and adjacent area, Virginia, West Virginia, and Maryland: U.S. Geological Survey Miscellaneous Field Studies Map, MF-2239, 1 sheet, 40 p., scale 1:100,000 [http://ngmdb.usgs.gov/Prodesc/proddesc_294.htm]


Summary:

Conodont biostratigraphy indicates that the Chambersburg Limestone in the Winchester 30 X 60 minute quadrangle is of Middle Ordovician (Blackriveran) age. Conodonts were recovered from the BALTONIODUS GERDAE Subzone of the AMORPHOGNATHUS TVAERENSIS Zone to a level above the B. GERDAE Subzone in the A. TVAERENSIS Zone.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


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