U.S. Geological Survey Home AASG Logo USGS HOME CONTACT USGS SEARCH USGS
National Geologic Map Database
Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Caseyville conglomerate
  • Modifications:
    • Named
  • Dominant lithology:
    • Sandstone
    • Conglomerate
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Illinois basin
Publication:

Owen, D.D., 1856, Report of the Geological Survey in Kentucky made during the years 1854 and 1855: Kentucky Geological Survey, v. 1, p. 3-248.


Summary:

Probably named for Caseyville, Union Co., KY. Also called Caseyville sandstone in report. Consists of pebbly sandstone and conglomerate [thickness not stated] resting on Millstone Grit in western KY.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Caseyville Formation*
  • Modifications:
    • Overview
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Illinois basin
Publication:

Goudarzi, G.H., 1970, Geologic map of the Glen Dean quadrangle, Breckinridge and Hancock Counties, Kentucky: U.S. Geological Survey Geologic Quadrangle Map, GQ-836, scale 1:24,000 [http://ngmdb.usgs.gov/Prodesc/proddesc_2138.htm]


Summary:

Caseyville Formation is composed of sandstone, siltstone, and shale. Sandstone: yellowish-brown, grayish-yellow, and gray sandstone; weathers red and reddish brown; fine to medium grained, some coarse grained; massive to thin bedded, locally cross-bedded; grades into siltstone and shale; in places contains clay balls, ferruginous lenses or concretions and rounded clear quartz pebbles as much as 1/8 inch in diameter. Conglomeratic sandstone at base exposed in southeast corner of quadrangle. Siltstone: light-gray, gray, yellowish-brown, and brown, thin-bedded, locally micaceous. Shale: light- to dark-gray and yellowish-brown; weathers reddish brown; locally clayey. Basal Pennsylvanian formation. Unconformity at base has maximum relief of about 250 ft, as deep as the base of the Waltersburg Member of Buffalo Wallow Formation. Thickness is 390+. Unconformably underlain by Mississippian rocks. Highest formation in quadrangle.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Caseyville Formation
  • Modifications:
    • Overview
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Illinois basin
Publication:

Willman, H.B., Atherton, Elwood, Buschbach, T.C., Collinson, Charles, Frye, J.C., Hopkins, M.E., Lineback, J.A., and Simon, J.A., 1975, Handbook of Illinois stratigraphy: Illinois Geological Survey Bulletin, no. 95, 261 p.


Summary:

Preferred usage of Illinois Geological Survey in 1975 is Caseyville Formation of McCormick Group. Primarily sandstone, siltstone, and shale. The sandstones are composed of quartz and very little clay and mica. Most contain quartz granules and pebbles, commonly less than half inch in diameter. The coarser sandstones reach about 100 ft thick and show relatively uniform cross-bedding with dip directions to the west, south, or southwest. Several coal seams, most somewhat lenticular, occur in the formation. Limestone is rare. The Caseyville is as much as 500 ft thick but 350 ft is common maximum. Unconformably overlies Mississippian rocks; underlies the Abbott Formation. Divided into Lusk Shale, Wayside Sandstone, Battery Rock Sandstone, Drury Shale, Sellers Limestone, Gentry Coal, and Pounds Sandstone Members.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Caseyville Formation
  • Modifications:
    • Revised
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Iowa shelf
Publication:

Ravn, R.L., Swade, J.W., Howes, M.R., Gregory, J.T., Anderson, R.R., and Van Dorpe, P.E., 1984, Stratigraphy of the Cherokee Group and revision of Pennsylvanian stratigraphic nomenclature in Iowa: Iowa Geological Survey Bureau Technical Information Series, no. 12.


Summary:

Identified in outcrops in the Mississippi River Valley in Muscatine Co, IA on the Iowa shelf where it unconformably overlies Devonian rocks and underlies the "Spoon" Formation. Two coal members named. The lower coal is named Wildcat Den Coal Member; it overlies 2.5 ft of unnamed gray shale of the basal Caseyville at Wildcat Den; overlies unnamed gray siltstone along Hwy 22, NE1/4, sec, T77N, R1W, Muscatine Co, IA. Cross sections. Graphic sections. Of Pennsylvanian, Morrowan age.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Denver GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Caseyville Formation
  • Modifications:
    • Revised
    • Biostratigraphic dating
    • Overview
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Illinois basin
Publication:

Nelson, W.J., Devera, J.A., and Jacobson, R.J., 1991, Stratigraphy of the bedrock [includes abstract and introduction], IN Nelson, W.J., and others, Geology of the Eddyville, Stonefort, and Creal Springs quadrangles, southern Illinois: Illinois Geological Survey Bulletin, no. 96, p. 1-43, (incl. geologic maps, scale 1:24,000), Accompanied by the Creal Springs (IGQ-4), Eddyville (IGQ-5), and Stonefort (IGQ-6) Illinois Geol. Survey Geol. Quad. Ser. maps, scale 1:24,000. Available online.


Summary:

The Caseyville Formation crops out extensively in the southern parts of all three quads included in this study. Thickness varies from 170 ft to more than 450 ft. Unit is characterized by white to light gray, relatively clean, quartzose sandstone. Commonly contains well-rounded granules and small pebbles of white quartz. Texture varies from very fine to very coarse grained, and bedding from very thin to massive. Four previously named members are recognized in the area: (ascending) Wayside, Battery Rock Sandstone, Drury, and Pounds Sandstone. The Drury is here changed from Drury Shale Member to Drury Member and revised to include the Gentry Coal Bed (rank reduced). The Wayside is here revised from Wayside Sandstone Member to Wayside Member because it contains large proportions of shale and siltstone. The Caseyville is assigned a Morrowan age based on palynological data.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Caseyville Formation
  • Modifications:
    • Overview
    • Revised
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Illinois basin
Publication:

Jacobson, R.J., 1992, Geology of the Goreville quadrangle, Johnson and Williamson Counties, Illinois: Illinois Geological Survey Bulletin, no. 97, 32 p.


Summary:

Caseyville Formation crops out through much of the southern one-third of the Goreville quad. Massive sandstones, more than 100 ft thick, produce large cliffs, ledges, and steep slopes. Composite thickness of the Caseyville in south-central to southwestern outcrop area ranges from 340 to 360 ft. For the most part, the Caseyville is composed of sandstones, quartz-pebble conglomerates, siltstones, shales, and claystones. Here subdivided into (ascending) Wayside Member (with its Omar sandstone lentil), Battery Rock Sandstone Member, Drury Member (with its Dutchman Creek sandstone lentil), and Pounds Sandstone Member. Caseyville is Early and Middle Pennsylvanian (Morrowan). [Morrowan here considered to extend into the Middle Pennsylvanian.]

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Caseyville Formation
  • Modifications:
    • Areal extent
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Illinois basin
Publication:

Nelson, W.J., 1993, Correlations in Raccoon Creek Group in the outcrop belt of Indiana, IN Kvale, E.P., ed., Illinois Basin Consortium symposium on economic resources of the Lower Pennsylvanian of the Illinois basin: Indiana Geological Survey Open-File Report, no. 93-7, p. 43-47.


Summary:

Caseyville lithologies (quartz arenite and quartz-pebble conglomerate) are present in Indiana, but are largely confined to valley fill in paleovalleys cut into Mississippian strata. Author suggests that a few changes in nomenclature may be in order.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Caseyville Formation
  • Modifications:
    • Overview
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Illinois basin
Publication:

Weibel, C.P., Nelson, W.J., Oliver, L.B., and Esling, S.P., 1993, Geology of the Waltersburg quadrangle, Pope County, Illinois: Illinois Geological Survey Bulletin, no. 98, 41 p., Accompanies C.P. Weibel, W.J. Nelson, and J.A. Devera, 1991, Illinois Geol. Survey Geol. Quad. Map Ser. IGQ-8, scale 1:24,000. Available online.


Summary:

Because most Pennsylvanian outcrops in the Waltersburg quad consists of sandstone, only "Wayside" sandstone lentils, the Battery Rock Sandstone Member, and the Pounds Sandstone Member were mapped. The "Wayside" and "Drury" Members are poorly defined and described in both their respective type areas and in the Waltersburg quad. Both are poorly exposed and their contacts generally concealed. The two cannot be differentiated from each other where the intervening Battery Rock is absent. These members are referred to as "Wayside" and "Drury" because of their questionable status as valid lithostratigraphic units in the Waltersburg quad.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Search archives

For more information, please contact Nancy Stamm, Geologic Names Committee Secretary.

Asterisk (*) indicates usage by the U.S. Geological Survey. Other usages by state geological surveys.

"No current usage" (†) implies that a name has been abandoned or has fallen into disuse. Former usage and, if known, replacement name given in parentheses ( ).

Slash (/) indicates name does not conform with nomenclatural guidelines (CSN, 1933; ACSN, 1961, 1970; NACSN, 1983, 2005). This may be explained within brackets ([ ]).