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National Geologic Map Database
Geologic Unit: Cape May
Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Cape May formation
  • Modifications:
    • Original reference
  • Dominant lithology:
    • Loam
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Atlantic Coast basin
Publication:

Salisbury, R.D., 1898, Surface geology: New Jersey Geological Survey Report of Progress, 1897, p. 1-22.


Summary:

Pg. 19-20. Cape May formation. Those deposits of late glacial and early postglacial time, which were made beyond region directly affected by the ice or its drainage. Includes much of loam which has heretofore been referred to under name "low-level Jamesburg." In places overlain by high-level loam, which in earlier reports was referred to under name "high level Jamesburg loam." Overlies Pensauken formation. Probably at least partly contemporaneous with drift of last [Wisconsin] glacial epoch. Covers whole of Cape May County, New Jersey. [Extends into southeastern Pennsylvania.]

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 896, p. 342).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Cape May formation*
  • Modifications:
    • Overview
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Atlantic Coast basin
Publication:

Wilmarth, M.G., 1936, [Selected Geologic Names Committee remarks (ca. 1910-1937) on Cenozoic rocks and sediment of the eastern U.S.], IN Wilmarth, M.G., 1938, Lexicon of geologic names of the United States (including Alaska): U.S. Geological Survey Bulletin, 896, pts. 1-2, 2396 p.


Summary:

Cape May formation. Is top formation of Columbia group, of nonglacial origin. Recognized in New Jersey and southeastern Pennsylvania. Age is late Pleistocene. Now [ca. 1936] considered to be of same age as glacial deposits of Wisconsin stage.

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 896, p. 342).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Cape May formation
  • Modifications:
    • Age modified
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Atlantic Coast basin
Publication:

MacClintock, Paul, 1943, Marine topography of the Cape May formation: Journal of Geology, v. 51, no. 7, p. 458-472.


Summary:

From evidence in New Jersey, the Cape May formation seems best referred to Sangamon interglacial stage.

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 1200, p. 622).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Cape May formation
  • Modifications:
    • Age modified
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Atlantic Coast basin
Publication:

Richards, H.G., 1944, Notes on the geology and paleontology of the Cape May canal, New Jersey: Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia Notulae Naturae, no. 134, 12 p.


Summary:

Pg. 5. Cape May formation. Apparently represents entire duration of the Pleistocene between last major interglacial and the Recent. At present, formation is divided into following zones or phases: (1) interglacial marine, sand and clay with warm water fauna, last major interglacial; (2) glacial marine, sand with cold-water fauna, early Wisconsin; (3) transitional, fine sand; and (4) fluvial, sand and gravel, Wisconsin and post-Wisconsin. Future work will probably show that term Cape May formation should not be used for all these phases. Studies made in excavations of Cape May Canal.

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 1200, p. 622).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Cape May formation
  • Modifications:
    • Areal extent
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Atlantic Coast basin
Publication:

Gray, Carlyle (compiler), 1960, Geologic map of Pennsylvania: Pennsylvania Geological Survey, 4th series, scale 1:250,000


Summary:

Cape May formation. Mapped in eastern Pennsylvania. Sands and gravels with clay and silt at base locally; includes areas of Recent alluvium and swamp deposits. Younger than Pensauken formation (Illinoian). Wisconsin stage. [Term Columbia group not used].

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 1200, p. 622).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Cape May Formation
  • Modifications:
    • Areal extent
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Piedmont-Blue Ridge province
Publication:

Geyer, A.R., and Wilshusen, J.P., 1982, Engineering characteristics of the rocks of Pennsylvania; environmental geology supplement to the State geologic map; 2nd edition, revised: Pennsylvania Geological Survey Environmental Geology Report, 4th series, no. 1, 300 p., Revision of McGlade, W.G., Geyer, A.R., and Wilshusen, J.P., 1972, "Engineering characteristics of the rocks of Pennsylvania," Pennsylvania Geol. Survey, 4th ser., Env. Geol. Rpt. EG 1, 200 p. (1st ed.)


Summary:

Trenton Gravel (reinstated) replaces Cape May Formation of earlier workers in PA. Reference section for Trenton is pit at Penn Valley, Bucks Co., PA, where it consists of gray to pale-reddish-brown, very gravelly sand. Interbedded, cross-bedded sand and clay-silt layers. Deeply weathered; good aquifer; good sand for construction materials.

Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


For more information, please contact Nancy Stamm, Geologic Names Committee Secretary.

Asterisk (*) indicates usage by the U.S. Geological Survey. Other usages by state geological surveys.

"No current usage" (†) implies that a name has been abandoned or has fallen into disuse. Former usage and, if known, replacement name given in parentheses ( ).

Slash (/) indicates name does not conform with nomenclatural guidelines (CSN, 1933; ACSN, 1961, 1970; NACSN, 1983, 2005). This may be explained within brackets ([ ]).