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National Geologic Map Database
Geologic Unit: Cacapon
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Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Cacapon sandstone*
  • Modifications:
    • Original reference
  • Dominant lithology:
    • Sandstone
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Appalachian basin
Publication:

Darton, N.H., and Taff, J.A., 1896, Piedmont folio, Maryland-West Virginia: U.S. Geological Survey Geologic Atlas of the United States Folio, GF-28, 6 p., scale 1:125,000


Summary:

Cacapon sandstone. Red flaggy sandstone, somewhat resembling Juniata formation but less massive and of a brighter red-brown color. Average thickness is 300 feet. Underlies Rockwood formation and overlies Tuscarora quartzite. Age is Silurian.

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 896, p. 310).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Cacapon sandstone member*
  • Modifications:
    • Revised
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Appalachian basin
Publication:

Wilmarth, M.G., 1936, [Selected Geologic Names Committee remarks (ca. 1931-1938) on Paleozoic rocks of the Appalachians], IN Wilmarth, M.G., 1938, Lexicon of geologic names of the United States (including Alaska): U.S. Geological Survey Bulletin, 896, pts. 1-2, 2396 p.


Summary:

Cacapon sandstone member of Clinton formation (adopted by the USGS). Is a sandstone in lower part of Clinton. Age is Silurian. Recognized in northern West Virginia and western Virginia.
Named from exposures on slopes of Cacapon Mountain, Winchester 15-min quadrangle, VA and WV.

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 896, p. 310).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Cacapon division [informal]
  • Modifications:
    • Revised
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Appalachian basin
Publication:

Butts, Charles, 1940, Geology of the Appalachian Valley in Virginia, Part 1: Virginia Geological Survey Bulletin, no. 52, 568 p.


Summary:

Pg. 238, 242, 243, 246. Referred to as Cacapon division of the Clinton. Included in lower part of Iron Gate facies (new). In colloquial use, term Cacapon for the part of the Clinton carrying red or iron sandstone is permissible. Thickness of division about 157 feet. Age is middle Silurian.

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 1200, p. 569).


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For more information, please contact Nancy Stamm, Geologic Names Committee Secretary.

Asterisk (*) indicates usage by the U.S. Geological Survey. Other usages by state geological surveys.

"No current usage" (†) implies that a name has been abandoned or has fallen into disuse. Former usage and, if known, replacement name given in parentheses ( ).

Slash (/) indicates name does not conform with nomenclatural guidelines (CSN, 1933; ACSN, 1961, 1970; NACSN, 1983, 2005). This may be explained within brackets ([ ]).