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Geologic Unit: Burr
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Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Burr limestone member
  • Modifications:
    • Original reference
  • Dominant lithology:
    • Shale
    • Limestone
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Nemaha anticline
    • Salina basin
    • Cherokee basin
    • Forest City basin
Publication:

Condra, G.E., and Busby, C.E., 1933, The Grenola formation: Nebraska Geological Survey Paper, no. 1, 31 p.


Summary:

Burr limestone member of Grenola formation. The newly established Grenola formation is divided into following members (descending): Neva limestone, Salem Point shale, Burr limestone, Legion shale, and Sallyards limestone. The salient lithologic feature of Burr member is its lamination. It is calcareous throughout and has a carbonaceous shale in the middle to north. Is of nearshore marine origin. Averages about 11 feet in thickness from Roca, [Lancaster County], Nebraska, to Burbank, [Osage County], Oklahoma, disregarding the abnormal Pawnee County, Nebraska, section. The upper Burr in Nebraska is light gray, with an extremely dense, carbonaceous lime cap that covers an ostracodal zone. The middle Burr in Nebraska, and northern Kansas is black or brownish shale containing abundant plant remains. The lower Burr in Nebraska consists of 1, 2, or 3 limestones separated by shale, and farther south it is irregular, shaly, and nodular with dark-gray mottling, and weathers platy or shattered.
Type locality: the bluffs and ravines west of South Fork of Little Nemaha River, in sec. 20, at point 0.25 mi west of north-south road, 2.5 mi northwest of Burr, Otoe Co., NE.

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 896, p. 302).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Burr limestone member
  • Modifications:
    • Revised
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Forest City basin
Publication:

Condra, G.E., 1935, Geologic cross-section, Forest City, Missouri to south of Du Bois, Nebraska: Nebraska Geological Survey Paper, no. 8, 23 p., Issued late in 1935. See also USGS unpub. corr. charts of Pennsylvanian and Permian rocks of KS and NE, compiled by M.G. Wilmarth, Secretary of Committee on Geologic Names, Oct. 1936


Summary:

Pg. 8. Burr limestone member of Grenola formation of Council Grove group. Consists of (descending): (1) gray massive limestone, 3.5 to 4 feet; (2) gray and black shale, 3.5 feet; (3) light gray massive limestone, 1.5 to 3.5 feet. Thickness 10 to 11 feet. Overlies Legion shale member and underlies Salem Point shale member. Condra states that the Kansas Geol. Survey correlates Legion shale and underlying Sallyards limestone with Roca shale formation. Age is considered Permian (lower part of Big Blue).
In 1936 (Kansas Geol. Survey Bull., no. 22) R.C. Moore transferred Roca shale to Permian. This change in Permian-Pennsylvanian boundary has not been considered [ca. 1938] by the USGS for its publications.

Source: Publication; US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 896, Roca entry p. 1823); GNC KS-NE Pennsylvanian Corr. Chart, sheet 2, Oct. 1936.


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Burr limestone member
  • Modifications:
    • Revised
Publication:

Moore, R.C., 1936, Stratigraphic classification of the Pennsylvanian rocks of Kansas: Kansas Geological Survey Bulletin, no. 22, 256 p., See also "Modern classifications of the Pennsylvanian rocks of eastern Kansas and southeastern Nebraska," compiled by M.G. Wilmarth, Secretary of Committee on Geologic Names, USGS unpub. corr. chart, Oct. 1936, sheet 2


Summary:

Burr limestone member, basal member of Grenola formation in lower part of Council Grove group. Transferred this unit to Permian (Big Blue series).
[This change in Pennsylvanian-Permian boundary has not been considered by USGS for it publications [ca. 1938].
See "Modern classifications of the Pennsylvanian rocks of eastern Kansas and southeastern Nebraska," compiled by M.G. Wilmarth, Secretary of Committee on Geologic Names, USGS unpub. corr. chart, Oct. 1936, sheet 2.]

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 896, p. 302); GNC KS-NE Pennsylvanian Corr. Chart, sheet 2, Oct. 1936.


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Burr limestone member
  • Modifications:
    • Overview
Publication:

Moore, R.C., Frye, J.C., Jewett, J.M., Lee, Wallace, and O'Connor, H.G., 1951, The Kansas rock column: Kansas Geological Survey Bulletin, no. 89, 132 p.


Summary:

Pg. 48. Burr limestone member of Grenola limestone. Underlies Salem Point shale member [and] overlies Legion shale member, [both of Grenola limestone]. Thickness 8 to 15 feet. Age is Early Permian (Wolfcamp).

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 1200, p. 548).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Burr Limestone Member
  • Modifications:
    • Overview
Publication:

Zeller, D.E. (editor), 1968, The stratigraphic succession in Kansas: Kansas Geological Survey Bulletin, no. 189, 81 p. [Available online from the Kansas Geological Survey: http://www.kgs.ku.edu/Publications/Bulletins/189]


Summary:

(Paleozoic Era; Permian System by H.G. O'Connor, D.E. Zeller, C.K. Bayne, J.M Jewett, and Ada Swineford, p. 46.) Burr Limestone Member of Grenola Limestone of Council Grove Group. Fossiliferous gray limestone and gray to olive-gray shale. In Chase County, Kansas, the middle limestone beds are very fine-grained and platy. Ostracodes are abundant in some of the limestones. Mollusks and other fossils are abundant locally in the lower beds. Thickness 1 to 15 feet. Age is Early Permian; Gearyan Provincial Stage (of H.G. O'Connor, 1963, AAPG Bull., v. 47, p. 1873-1877).

Source: Publication.


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