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Geologic Unit: Bromide
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Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Bromide formation
  • Modifications:
    • Original reference
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • South Oklahoma folded belt
Publication:

Ulrich, E.O., 1911, Revision of the Paleozoic systems: Geological Society of America Bulletin, v. 22, p. 281-680.


Summary:

Pl. 27. Showed a new formation, called Bromide, of Black River and uppermost Chazy age, as overlying, in places unconformably, Simpson formation (restricted), and unconformably underlying Viola limestone, in Arbuckle Mountains, Oklahoma, the typical region of the Simpson and the Viola. As originally defined and used up to this time the Viola rested on the Simpson. Age is Middle Ordovician.

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 896, p. 270-271).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Bromide group
  • Modifications:
    • Revised
  • Dominant lithology:
    • Limestone
    • Sandstone
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • South Oklahoma folded belt
Publication:

Edson, F.C., 1927, Ordovician correlations in Oklahoma: American Association of Petroleum Geologists Bulletin, v. 11, no. 9, p. 967-975. [Available online, with subscription, from AAPG archives: http://www.aapg.org/datasystems or http://search.datapages.com]


Summary:

Pg. 967-975. Simpson formation divided into Bromide group above and "Wilcox" sand below. The Bromide is a series of magnesium limes and sands, in places interbedded with small amounts of green shale. Thickness 315 to 495 feet in Arbuckle Mountains; 0 to 600 feet in Midcontinent field. The descriptive term "post-Wilcox" was applied by Luther White to these beds to indicate that part of Simpson formation which is younger than "Wilcox" sand. Ulrich (1911) classified Bromide formation as occurring between Simpson formation and Viola limestone. Taff mapped type locality of Bromide formation, near Bromide, [in] sec. 19, T. 1 S., R. 8 E., as lower Viola limestone. This outcrop was visited recently by a party of geologists under direction of Oklahoma Geological Survey, and all present agreed that this outcrop is made up of sediments that in every way resemble the "post-Wilcox" well cuttings. It is suggested by Luther White, the writer, and others that term "post-Wilcox" be dropped and that Bromide be retained to designate the group of sediments that occurs between "Wilcox" sand and Viola lime.

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 896, p. 270-271).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Bromide division
  • Modifications:
    • Revised
    • Biostratigraphic dating
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • South Oklahoma folded belt
Publication:

Ulrich, E.O., 1927, Fossiliferous boulders in the Ouachita "Caney" shale and the age of the shale containing them: Oklahoma Geological Survey Bulletin, no. 45, 48 p.


Summary:

Pg. 21-32. Simpson formation of Taff comprises at least 3 faunas of exceedingly diverse origin and geographic distribution. None of these faunas, nor any beds that might contain them, are found in southern Missouri or Arkansas. The closing stage, provisionally added to top of Bromide division of Simpson, contains a good representative of Decorah and Prosser faunas of Minnesota (Black River and lower Trenton). Typical Bromide is of late Chazy age [and is shown as constituting topmost part of Simpson formation].

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 896, p. 270-271).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Bromide formation
    • Bromide [beds]
  • Modifications:
    • Overview
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • South Oklahoma folded belt
Publication:

Wilmarth, M.G., 1928, [Selected Geologic Names Committee remarks (ca. 1915-1930) on Cambrian and Ordovician rocks], IN Wilmarth, M.G., 1938, Lexicon of geologic names of the United States (including Alaska): U.S. Geological Survey Bulletin, 896, pts. 1-2, 2396 p.


Summary:

In manuscript chart dated April 1928 (but not published by him) E.O. Ulrich divided Simpson formation of Taff into (descending): (1) West Spring Creek formation, Criner member (of Trenton and Black River age); unconformably on (2) Bromide formation; and (3) Oil Creek formation, the latter having great unconformity at base.
At Dec. 1928 meeting of GSA, in New York, Ulrich exhibited a manuscript chart (which he did not publish) in which he divided Simpson formation into (descending) "Bromide", "Criner", "Tulip Creek", McLish, Falls, Nebo, and "Joins Ranch", as reported by Dr. C.N. Gould. Ulrich's 1928 list of names as reported by Gould was published by C.E. Decker in Dec. 1930 (AAPG Bull., v. 14, no. 12, p. 1496).
E.O. Ulrich (letter dated Nov. 11, 1929; published by C.E. Decker in Oklahoma Geol. Survey Bull., no. 55, p. 40, 1931) stated "As used by me in past 2 years the Bromide includes all beds of Black River and Trenton ages that were deposited in Arbuckle region."
In Feb. 1930 (US Natl. Mus. Proc., v. 76, art. 21, p. 73) Ulrich divided Simpson formation into (descending): "Bromide" (of Trenton and Biack River age) unconformable on "Criner"; "Tulip Creek", Falls, McLish, "Oil Creek", and "Joins".

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 896, p. 271, 2312).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Bromide formation
  • Modifications:
    • Areal extent
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • South Oklahoma folded belt
Publication:

Decker, C.E., 1930, Simpson group of Arbuckle and Wichita Mountains, Oklahoma: American Association of Petroleum Geologists Bulletin, v. 14, no. 12, p. 1493-1505., See also Pan-Amer. Geol., v. 53, no. 3, p. 225, 1930 [abs.] [Available online, with subscription, from AAPG archives: http://www.aapg.org/datasystems or http://search.datapages.com]


Summary:

Pg. 1498-1505. Bromide formation. Chiefly limestones, some shale, some sandstone, with a sandstone of variable thickness at base. Thickness of formation 171 to 600+/- feet. Of Trenton and Black River age. Ovelries Tulip Creek formation and underlies Viola limestone. As Bromide has been used more extensively in connection with the Simpson it seems best to retain it for the upper formation and drop Criner.

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 896, p. 270-271).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Bromide formation
  • Modifications:
    • Revised
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • South Oklahoma folded belt
Publication:

Edson, F.C., 1930, Lower Paleozoic unconformities: American Association of Petroleum Geologists Bulletin, v. 14, no. 7, p. 947. [Available online, with subscription, from AAPG archives: http://www.aapg.org/datasystems or http://search.datapages.com]


Summary:

Pg. 947. Bromide formation is overlain, with angular unconformity, by Viola limestone, and underlain, with angular unconformity, by Tulip Creek formation.

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 896, p. 270-271).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Bromide formation
  • Modifications:
    • Revised
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • South Oklahoma folded belt
Publication:

Decker, C.E., and Merritt, C.A., 1931, The stratigraphy and physical characteristics of the Simpson group: Oklahoma Geological Survey Bulletin, no. 55, 112 p.


Summary:

Pg. 11-12, 98. The Simpson is here raised to a group, divided into 5 formations (ascending): Joins, Oil Creek, McLish, Tulip Creek, and Bromide. Heretofore Bromide, in various tables, has been used to represent a number of different horizons, but its last use was to limit it to upper part of section exposed in hill just west of the hotel at Bromide, and it was thought that the fauna represented in this section was yonnger than that found in upper part of Simpson elsewhere. Further studies of a section above tbe 3 artesian wells at northeast edge of Bromide, and sections on Robertson Ranch about 3 miles south of Bromide, have contributed evidence to show that certain parts of fauna and the physical characteristics of upper part of the Simpson at east end of mountains are almost identical with those of upper part of Simpson in most of its outcrops. As Bromide has been used more extensively and longer in connection with the Simpson, it is thought better to retain it as the name for upper formation of this group and drop Criner, which was at first the name of a member, but later was raised to formation name before it was realized the fauna at Rock Crossing in Criner Hills is largely a duplication of upper Simpson fauna to the north, with addition of several apparently local forms.
Named from town of Bromide, Johnston Co., wbere type section was made on a hill northwest of Galbraith Hotel.

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 896, p. 270-271).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Bromide formation
  • Modifications:
    • Areal extent
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • South Oklahoma folded belt
Publication:

Ulrich, E.O., 1933, Simpson group of Oklahoma [abs.]: Geological Society of America Bulletin, v. 44, pt. 1, p. 105-106.


Summary:

Pg. 105. Bromide formation included in Simpson group. Typical Bromide correlates with Lowville.

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 896, p. 270-271).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Bromide formation
  • Modifications:
    • Overview
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • South Oklahoma folded belt
Publication:

Decker, C.E., 1941, Simpson group of Arbuckle and Wichita Mountains of Oklahoma: American Association of Petroleum Geologists Bulletin, v. 25, no. 4, p. 650-667. [Available online, with subscription, from AAPG archives: http://www.aapg.org/datasystems or http://search.datapages.com]


Summary:

Pg. 655-656, measured sections. Outcrops are more widespread than those of any other formation of Simpson group. Measured sections show thickness varies from 87.5 feet to 674.5 feet. Uppermost formation of group; overlies Tulip Creek formation.

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 1200, p. 489).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Bromide formation*
  • Modifications:
    • Overview
    • Age modified
    • Biostratigraphic dating
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • South Oklahoma folded belt
Publication:

Loeblich, A.R., Jr., 1942, Bryozoa from the Ordovician Bromide formation, Oklahoma: Journal of Paleontology, v. 16, no. 4, p. 413-436., See also "A study of the McLish (Middle Ordovician) Bryozoa of the Arbuckle Mountains," Oklahoma Univ. Bull., no. 850, p. 75, 1942 [abs.]


Summary:

Pg. 413-436. Formation, as used in this report, is same as that defined and mapped by Decker and Merritt (1931, Oklahoma Geol. Survey Bull., no. 55) and thus includes typical Bromide, Criner, and Cool Creek formations of Ulrich. At type section, herein described for first time, formation includes 15 beds with total thickness of 127.5 feet; underlies Viola limestone; base of section covered. Evidence presented by bryozoa suggests lower Trenton age, and fauna is closely allied to Decorah of Minnesota. Review of previous stratigraphic work.

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 1200, p. 489).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Bromide formation*
  • Modifications:
    • Age modified
    • Biostratigraphic dating
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • South Oklahoma folded belt
Publication:

Bassler, R.S., 1943, New Ordovician cystidean echinoderms from Oklahoma: American Journal of Science, v. 241, no. 11, p. 694-705.


Summary:

Pg. 694-695. Black River age on basis of cystids.

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 1200, p. 489).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Bromide formation
  • Modifications:
    • Age modified
    • Biostratigraphic dating
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • South Oklahoma folded belt

Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Bromide formation*
  • Modifications:
    • Age modified
    • Biostratigraphic dating
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • South Oklahoma folded belt
Publication:

Cooper, G.A., 1956, Chazyan and related brachiopods [U.S.-Canada]: Smithsonian Miscellaneous Collections, v. 127, pt. 1, 1245 p.


Summary:

Pg. 120-123, chart 1. Bromide formation. Consists of sandstone, shale, and limestone, latter predominating at least in upper part. Thickest at west end of Arbuckle Mountains where it measures 647 feet. Subdivided into two members: Mountain Lake below and Pooleville above (both new). Overlies Tulip Creek formation; underlies Viola formation. Bromide has been variously placed from Chazyan to Trenton. Brachiopod evidence does not support Loeblich's (1942) conclusion of a lower Trenton age. Chart shows Bromide spans interval from upper part of Chazyan to upper part of Bolarian.

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 1200, p. 489).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Bromide formation
  • Modifications:
    • Age modified
    • Biostratigraphic dating
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • South Oklahoma folded belt
Publication:

Harris, R.W., 1957, Ostracoda of the Simpson group of Oklahoma: Oklahoma Geological Survey Bulletin, no. 75, 333 p.


Summary:

Pg. 84-94, fig. 1, charts 1, 2. Loeblich (1942) measured and described type section. Topmost 10 to 18 feet of dense, thin-bedded limestone of Loeblich's beds 2 and 3 are quite probably Corbin Ranch formation (new) of this report. Also, it is quite possible that lower part of section (plus covered section at base) involves some normal or faulted Tulip Creek strata. U.S. Highway 77 Bromide section is 427 feet thick and subdivisible into a 55- to 60-foot basal sandstone and a 370-foot section of overlying shales and limestones; West Spring Creek section is 420 feet thick and subdivisible into same basal sandstone 60 to 75 feet thick, and overlying shale and limestone section 355 feet thick. Disconformable contact with both underlying Tulip Creek and overlying Corbin Ranch. Ostracoda discussed. Fossils indicate an age essentially Blackriverian.

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 1200, p. 489).


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