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Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Boone Creek limestone
  • Modifications:
    • Areal extent
  • Dominant lithology:
    • Limestone
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Fort Worth syncline
Publication:

Armstrong, J.M., 1929, Geologic map of Jack County, Texas (preliminary edition): University of Texas-Austin, Bureau of Economic Geology, Maps by the AAPG Cooperative Mapping Committee


Summary:

Boone Creek limestone, 5+/- feet thick, is in Palo Pinto formation, and Willow Point limestone is in Graford formation, 40+/- feet above Bridgeport coal. [Age is Pennsylvanian.]

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 896, p. 236-237).


  • Usage in publication:
    • Boone Creek limestone
  • Modifications:
    • Areal extent
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Fort Worth syncline
Publication:

Sellards, E.H., 1931, [Discussion in News Letter, September, 1931]: University of Texas-Austin, Bureau of Economic Geology


Summary:

In Wise County [central northern Texas] the Palo Pinto limestone has been found to be divided into 2 thin limestones separated by shale. The limestones are named Boone Creek and Willow Point. [Age is Pennsylvanian.]

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 896, p. 236-237).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Boone Creek limestone
  • Modifications:
    • Areal extent
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Fort Worth syncline
Publication:

Scott, Gayle, and Armstrong, J.M., 1932, The geology of Wise County, Texas: University of Texas Bulletin, no. 3224, 77 p.


Summary:

Pg. 23. Boone Creek limestone included in Palo Pinto formation. [Age is Pennsylvanian.]

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 896, p. 236-237).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Boone Creek limestone
  • Modifications:
    • Overview
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Fort Worth syncline
Publication:

Sellards, E.H., 1933, The pre-Paleozoic and Paleozoic systems in Texas, Part 1, IN Sellards, E.H., Adkins, W.S., and Plummer, F.B, The geology of Texas; Volume 1, Stratigraphy: University of Texas Bulletin, no. 3232, p. 15-238., Published July, 1933


Summary:

Pg. 105. Boone Creek limestone in Palo Pinto formation, is named from Boone Creek, Jack County, central northern Texas.
[Boone Creek limestone member of Palo Pinto limestone of Pennsylvanian age adopted by the USGS. Recognized in Jack and Wise Counties, Brazos River region, central northern Texas.]

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 896, p. 236-237).


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For more information, please contact Nancy Stamm, Geologic Names Committee Secretary.

Asterisk (*) indicates published by U.S. Geological Survey authors.

"No current usage" (†) implies that a name has been abandoned or has fallen into disuse. Former usage and, if known, replacement name given in parentheses ( ).

Slash (/) indicates name does not conform with nomenclatural guidelines (CSN, 1933; ACSN, 1961, 1970; NACSN, 1983, 2005). This may be explained within brackets ([ ]).