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Geologic Unit: Auburn
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Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Auburn chert
  • Modifications:
    • Original reference
  • Dominant lithology:
    • Limestone
    • Chert
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Lincoln anticline
Publication:

Rowley, R.R., 1908, The geology of Pike County [Missouri]: Missouri Bureau of Geology and Mines Report, 2nd series, v. 8, 122 p.


Summary:

Pg. 14, 16. Auburn chert. Intensely hard bluish limestone, with soft chert bands full of fossils, forming surface stone of Auburn, Lincoln County, central-eastern Missouri. Included in Trenton limestone. [Age is Middle Ordovician.]

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 896, p. 91).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Auburn chert
  • Modifications:
    • Age modified
    • Biostratigraphic dating
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Lincoln anticline
Publication:

Foerste, A.F., 1920, The Kimmswick and Plattin limestones of northeastern Missouri: Denison University, Bulletin of the Scientific Laboratories, v. 19, p. 175-224.


Summary:

Pg. 175-194. Auburn chert. Correlated Auburn chert with Decorah shale, and stated that it "apparently lies at about same horizon as Bryant limestone." [Age is Middle Ordovician.]

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 896, p. 91).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Auburn chert
  • Modifications:
    • Revised
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Lincoln anticline
Publication:

Bradley, J.H., 1925, Stratigraphy of the Kimmswick limestone of Missouri and Illinois: Journal of Geology, v. 33, no. 1, p. 49-74.


Summary:

Pg. 66. Stated that Auburn chert is included in Plattin formation. [Age is Middle Ordovician.]
[Misprint (USGS Bull. 896, p. 91): cited reference, Missouri Bur. Geol. and Mines, 2nd ser., v. 2, should be Jour. Geol., v. 33, no. 1.]

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 896, p. 91).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Auburn chert
  • Modifications:
    • Overview
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Lincoln anticline
Publication:

Wilmarth, M.G., 1928, [Selected Geologic Names Committee remarks (ca. 1915-1930) on Cambrian and Ordovician rocks], IN Wilmarth, M.G., 1938, Lexicon of geologic names of the United States (including Alaska): U.S. Geological Survey Bulletin, 896, pts. 1-2, 2396 p.


Summary:

C.L. Fenton (1928) and S. Weller and S. St. Clair (1928). See under Plattin limestone.
J. Bridge, March 1937 (personal note). Auburn chert is = Decorah or possibly is slightly younger. [Age is Middle Ordovician.]

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 896, p. 91).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Auburn chert
  • Modifications:
    • Overview
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Lincoln anticline

Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Auburn chert
  • Modifications:
    • Age modified
    • Biostratigraphic dating
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Lincoln anticline
Publication:

Cooper, G.A., 1956, Chazyan and related brachiopods [U.S.-Canada]: Smithsonian Miscellaneous Collections, v. 127, pt. 1, 1245 p.


Summary:

Pg. 117. Auburn chert. Has been suggested that Auburn chert be included in Plattin group, but brachiopods are not in accord with this suggestion. Presence of RAFINESQUINA indicates a higher correlation. Here suggested that formation may be chertified Decorah of Missouri, =Barnhart formation (new), rather than Plattin and correlation should be with Guttenberg member of Decorah. [Age is Middle Ordovician (Trentonian of Twenhofel and others, 1954, GSA Bull., v. 65, p. 247-298).]

Source: Publication; US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 1200, p. 170).


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For more information, please contact Nancy Stamm, Geologic Names Committee Secretary.

Asterisk (*) indicates usage by the U.S. Geological Survey. Other usages by state geological surveys.

"No current usage" (†) implies that a name has been abandoned or has fallen into disuse. Former usage and, if known, replacement name given in parentheses ( ).

Slash (/) indicates name does not conform with nomenclatural guidelines (CSN, 1933; ACSN, 1961, 1970; NACSN, 1983, 2005). This may be explained within brackets ([ ]).