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National Geologic Map Database
Geologic Unit: Apison
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Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Apison shale*
  • Modifications:
    • Original reference
  • Dominant lithology:
    • Shale
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Appalachian basin
Publication:

Hayes, C.W., 1894, Ringgold folio, Georgia-Tennessee: U.S. Geological Survey Geologic Atlas of the United States Folio, GF-2, 3 p., scale 1:125,000


Summary:

(Ringgold, Kingston, and Chattanooga folios). Apison shale. Brightly colored, slightly sandy or clayey shales, banded in red, purple, green, and yellow colors. A bed of gray siliceous limestone [†Beaver limestone] sometimes occurs between this and overlying Rome formation. Thickness of formation more than 1,000 feet. Oldest formation in region. Age is Early Cambrian.

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 896, p. 61).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Apison shale*
  • Modifications:
    • Overview
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Appalachian basin (Eastern Overthrust area)
Publication:

Wilmarth, M.G., 1936, [Selected Geologic Names Committee remarks (ca. 1931-1938) on Paleozoic rocks of the Appalachians], IN Wilmarth, M.G., 1938, Lexicon of geologic names of the United States (including Alaska): U.S. Geological Survey Bulletin, 896, pts. 1-2, 2396 p.


Summary:

Apison shale. According to C.E. Resser (personal commun. May 1936) the Apison shale is part of Rome formation, and so-called Beaver limestone of Knoxville folio is a limestone lentil in Rome formation. Age is Early Cambrian.
Named from exposures at Apison, James Co. [now Hamilton Co.], eastern TN. Extends into western NC, and northwestern GA.

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 896, p. 61).


Map showing publication footprint
  • Usage in publication:
    • Apison shale member
  • Modifications:
    • Revised
  • AAPG geologic province:
    • Appalachian basin
Publication:

Rodgers, John, 1953, Geologic map of east Tennessee with explanatory text: Tennessee Division of Geology Bulletin, no. 58, pt. 2, 167 p.


Summary:

Pg. 44; pt. 1, pl. 12. Apison shale member of Rome formation. Variegated shale. Mapped as a basal member of Rome formation. Underlies an unnamed sandstone-bearing member of Rome. Age is Early Cambrian.

Source: US geologic names lexicon (USGS Bull. 1200, p. 117).


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For more information, please contact Nancy Stamm, Geologic Names Committee Secretary.

Asterisk (*) indicates usage by the U.S. Geological Survey. Other usages by state geological surveys.

"No current usage" (†) implies that a name has been abandoned or has fallen into disuse. Former usage and, if known, replacement name given in parentheses ( ).

Slash (/) indicates name does not conform with nomenclatural guidelines (CSN, 1933; ACSN, 1961, 1970; NACSN, 1983, 2005). This may be explained within brackets ([ ]).