USGS Visual Identifier

GEOLEX

Summary of Citation: Bautista

Publication:
Frick, Childs, 1921, Extinct vertebrate faunas of the badlands
   of Bautista Creek and San Timoteo Canyon, southern California:
   University of California Publications in Geological Sciences,
   v. 12, no. 5, p. 277-424
Usage in Publication:
Bautista beds

Modifications: Geologic Province: Dominant Lithology:
 Named
 Peninsular Ranges province
 Conglomerate
Clay

Summary:
[Probably named for] Bautista Creek or Bautista Creek Badlands which lie within foothills of San Jacinto Mountain, six mi to southeast of badlands of San Timoteo Canyon, San Jacinto quad, southern CA. Type locality of Bautista fossils is south of San Jacinto River. Pleistocene vertebrate fossils were evidently accumulated in part in playa-like lake as series of fine, worked-over fanglomerates and clays derived from low highlands of immediate north and east. List and description of fossils included.
Summary of Citation: Bautista

Publication:
Fraser, D.M., 1931, Geology of San Jacinto quadrangle south of
   San Gorgonio Pass, California: California Division of Mines
   and Geology, Mining in California, v. 27, p. 494-539
Usage in Publication:
Bautista beds

Modifications: Geologic Province: Dominant Lithology:
 Areal limits
 Peninsular Ranges province
 

Summary:
Mapped in San Jacinto quad south of San Gorgonio Pass, CA. Described as coarse, loosely consolidated, lenticular, grayish sandstone and poorly lithified shale, 1500 or 2000 ft thick, with areal extent of about 25 sq mi. In Vandeventer Flat area beds have areal extent of 8 or 10 sq mi and are chiefly composed of arkosic sandstone. Is Pleistocene age.
Summary of Citation: Bautista

Publication:
Axelrod, D.I., 1966, The Pleistocene Soboba flora of southern
   California: University of California Publications in Geological
   Sciences, v. 60, 79 p.
Usage in Publication:
Bautista formation

Modifications: Geologic Province: Dominant Lithology:
 Revised
 Peninsular Ranges province
 

Summary:
Bautista beds (Fraser, 1931) is formally named Bautista formation. Is exposed in several areas along San Jacinto fault zone (San Jacinto River wash, Hemet Valley-Vandeventer Flat, Park Hill, and adjacent to Horse Creek). Small area at head of Diamond Valley, 6 mi south of Hemet, is mapped as older alluvium by MacRostie and Dolcini (1959) rather than as Bautista. Because Bautista formation is as deformed as nearby Pliocene formation, geologic evidence suggests it is not younger than early Pleistocene. Lists of Bautista fauna and flora included.
Summary of Citation: Bautista

Publication:
Sharp, R.V., 1967, San Jacinto fault zone in the Peninsular
   Ranges of southern California: Geological Society of America
   Bulletin, v. 78, no. 6, p. 705-730
Usage in Publication:
Bautista beds

Modifications: Geologic Province: Dominant Lithology:
 Age modified
 Peninsular Ranges province
 

Summary:
Shown on generalized geologic map of San Jacinto fault zone as Tertiary(?) and Pleistocene age.
Summary of Citation: Bautista

Publication:
Calzia, J.P., Madden-McGuire, D.J., Oliver, H.W. and Schreiner,
   R.A., 1988, Mineral resources of the Santa Rosa Mountains
   Wilderness Study Area, Riverside County, California, IN
   Mineral resources of wilderness study areas; south-central
   California Desert Conservation Area, California: U.S. Geological
   Survey Bulletin, 1710-D, p. D1-D, (incl. geologic map, scale
   1:62,500)
Usage in Publication:
Bautista Formation

Modifications: Geologic Province: Dominant Lithology:
 Age modified
 Peninsular Ranges province
 

Summary:
Consists of poorly indurated fanglomerate deposits that were shed southwestward during uplift of Santa Rosa Mountains. Unconformably overlies Peninsular Ranges batholith and Santa Rosa mylonite zone. Age is Pliocene and/or Pleistocene.