USGS Visual Identifier

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Geologic Unit: Sharpsville

Publication:
White, I.C., 1880, The geology of Mercer County, Pennsylvania: 
   Pennsylvania Geological Survey Report of Progress, 2nd series, 
   v. QQQ, 233 p.
Usage in Publication:
Sharpsville sandstone

Modifications: Geologic Province: Dominant Lithology:
 Named
 Appalachian basin
 Sandstone

Summary:
Sharpsville sandstone is a well-defined and persistent group of alternating layers of sandstone and shale in beds 1 to 5 ft thick. The shale layers are usually much thinner than the sandstone layers. The fine-grained sandstones are a peculiar dark grayish brown color and are quarried at many places along Shenango River, especially at Sharpsville. Thickness of formation 50 to 60 ft. Underlies Crawford shales and overlies Orangeville shales.
Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Publication:
Cushing, H.P., Leverett, Frank, and Van Horn, F.R., 1931, Geology 
   and mineral resources of the Cleveland district, Ohio: U.S. 
   Geological Survey Bulletin, 818, 138 p.
Usage in Publication:
Sharpsville sandstone*

Modifications: Geologic Province: Dominant Lithology:
 Revised
 Appalachian basin
 

Summary:
Cuyahoga, in its typical area, is elevated to group rank and its subdivisions (ascending) Orangeville shale, Sharpsville sandstone, and Meadville shale are treated as formations. Thickness 25 to 50 ft in Cleveland, OH, area. Contacts with Orangeville and Meadville transitional.
Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Publication:
de Witt, Wallace, Jr., 1946, The stratigraphic relationship of 
   the Berea, Corry, and Cussewago sandstones in northeastern 
   Ohio and northwestern Pennsylvania: U.S. Geological Survey 
   Oil and Gas Investigations Chart, OC-21, 1 sheet., Also, 
   Pepper, J.F., de Witt, Wallace, Jr., and Demarest, D.F., 
   1954, "Geology of the Bedford Shale and Berea Sandstone in 
   the Appalachian basin," U.S. Geological Survey Professional 
   Paper 259, 111 p.
Usage in Publication:
Sharpsville sandstone*

Modifications: Geologic Province: Dominant Lithology:
 Overview
 Appalachian basin
 

Summary:
Sharpsville is composed of varying amounts of flaggy sandstone and interbedded sandy shales. Base is drawn at first massive sandstone in shale section above Berea sandstone or Corry sandstone. Locally, near Warren, OH, and Meadville, PA, lower part of Sharpsville is composed almost completely of massive sandstone and can be used for local correlation. Elsewhere the Sharpsville is composed of thin flaggy sandstones, and boundaries can not be drawn definitely. Base of Sharpsville is irregular. In some areas, flags of the Sharpsville are almost in contact with the Berea, but in some areas a thick shale separates the two units. In vicinity of Titusville, PA, the Sharpsville merges with underlying Orangeville shale.
Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Publication:
Pepper, J.F., de Witt, Wallace, Jr., and Demarest, D.F., 1954, 
   Geology of the Bedford shale and Berea sandstone in the 
   Appalachian basin: U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper, 
   259, 111 p., Also, de Witt, Wallace, Jr., 1946, U.S. Geological 
   Survey Oil and Gas Investigations Preliminary Chart 21. 
   [Available online from the USGS PubsWarehouse:  http://
   pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/pp/pp259]
Usage in Publication:
Sharpsville sandstone*

Modifications: Geologic Province: Dominant Lithology:
 Overview
 Appalachian basin
 

Summary:
In OH, base of Sharpsville is generally placed at base of first massive bed of siltstone in shale sequence above the Berea except in those areas where the Aurora or Chardon member is present near base of Orangeville shale. In northwestern PA, the Sharpsville is first massive siltstone above Bartholomew siltstone member of Orangeville shale, except in local area in Crawford Co. where the Bartholomew is absent and its place is occupied by Hungry Run sandstone member.
Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Publication:
de Witt, Wallace, Jr., 1970, Age of the Bedford Shale, Berea 
   Sandstone, and Sunbury Shale in the Appalachian and Michigan 
   basins, Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Michigan, IN Contributions 
   to stratigraphy, 1969: U.S. Geological Survey Bulletin, 
   1294-G, p. G1-G11.
Usage in Publication:
Sharpsville Sandstone*

Modifications: Geologic Province: Dominant Lithology:
 Age modified
 Appalachian basin
 

Summary:
Age of Sharpsville Sandstone of Cuyahoga Group changed from Mississippian to Early Mississippian.
Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Publication:
Dodge, C.H., 1992, Bedrock lithostratigraphy of Warren County, 
   Pennsylvania, IN Sevon, W.D., ed., Geology of the upper 
   Allegheny River region in Warren County, northwestern 
   Pennsylvania; Guidebook for the 57th annual field conference 
   of Pennsylvania geologists: Field Conference of Pennsylvania 
   Geologists, no. 57, p. 1-20.
Usage in Publication:
Sharpsville Sandstone Member

Modifications: Geologic Province: Dominant Lithology:
 Revised
 Appalachian basin
 

Summary:
In PA, the Cuyahoga has traditionally been given group rank and subdivided into three formations: Orangeville Shale, Sharpsville Sandstone, and Meadville Shale. Because of limited mappability, the subdivisions are herein regarded as members of the Cuyahoga Formation, which is practically all shale in the study area.
Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).