USGS Visual Identifier

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Geologic Unit: Ohio

Publication:
Andrews, E.B., 1870, Report of progress in the second district, 
   Part II, IN Report of progress in 1869: Ohio Division of 
   Geological Survey Report of Progress, 2nd series, p. 55-135.
Usage in Publication:
Ohio black slate

Modifications: Geologic Province: Dominant Lithology:
 Named
 Cincinnati arch
 Appalachian basin
 Slate

Summary:
Named Ohio black slate. Thickness is 320 ft in type locality. Overlain by Waverly sandstone.
Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Publication:
Pepper, J.F., de Witt, Wallace, Jr., and Demarest, D.F., 1954, 
   Geology of the Bedford shale and Berea sandstone in the 
   Appalachian basin: U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper, 
   259, 111 p., Also, de Witt, Wallace, Jr., 1946, U.S. Geological 
   Survey Oil and Gas Investigations Preliminary Chart 21. 
   [Available online from the USGS PubsWarehouse:  http://
   pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/pp/pp259]
Usage in Publication:
Ohio shale*

Modifications: Geologic Province: Dominant Lithology:
 Overview
 Appalachian basin
 Cincinnati arch
 Shale

Summary:
Ohio shale crops out from Cuyahoga Co. in northern OH to Pulaski Co. in southern KY. In northern OH, can be divided into two shale units, the Huron and overlying Cleveland members. In part of the area, the Huron and Cleveland are separated by the Chagrin shale. Elsewhere the two members are difficult to separate. The Ohio shale is composed of tough, hard, grayish-black shale. The Huron member contains large septarian concretions. The Cleveland is mostly black shale but also contains in the lower part many beds of bluish-gray or gray clay shale, some thin gray to brown siltstone beds, many small nodules and lumps of pyrite and several thin siliceous limestone beds characterized by cone-in-cone structure. The Ohio shale is more than 500 ft thick in Huron Co. in northern OH, 376 ft thick in Ross Co. in southern OH, 250 ft thick in Lewis Co. in northern KY, and 95 ft thick in Estill Co. in east-central KY. Overlain by Bedford shale. Age is Late Devonian.
Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Publication:
Provo, L.J., Kepferle, R.C., and Potter, P.E., 1978, Division 
   of black Ohio Shale in eastern Kentucky: American Association 
   of Petroleum Geologists Bulletin, v. 62, no. 9, p. 1703-1713. 
   [Available online, with subscription, from AAPG archives:  
   http://www.aapg.org/datasystems or  http://
   search.datapages.com]
Usage in Publication:
Ohio Shale*

Modifications: Geologic Province: Dominant Lithology:
 Revised
 Appalachian basin
 Cincinnati arch
 

Summary:
Three Lick Bed named in Ohio Shale. Overlies Huron Member and underlies Cleveland Member of Ohio Shale. Thin marker bed that is recognizable lithologically and on scintillometer profiles on the surface and on gamma-ray logs in the subsurface in central and southeastern OH and eastern KY and into western WV, western VA, and northeastern TN.
Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Publication:
de Witt, Wallace, Jr., and Roen, J.B., 1985, Correlation and 
   geographic extent of some Middle and Upper Devonian and Lower 
   Mississippian black shales in the Appalachian basin, IN 
   Stratigraphic notes, 1984: U.S. Geological Survey Bulletin, 
   1605-A, p. A45-A57.
Usage in Publication:
Ohio Shale*

Modifications: Geologic Province: Dominant Lithology:
 Overview
 Appalachian basin
 

Summary:
Ohio Shale and its component Huron and Cleveland Members extended in the subsurface, mainly by means of gamma-ray logs, through most of eastern OH and eastern KY and into western WV and western VA. Huron Member also extended into western PA.
Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Publication:
Robl, T.L., and Barron, L.S., 1988, The geochemistry of Devonian 
   black shales in central Kentucky and its relationship to 
   inter-basinal correlation and depositional environment, IN 
   McMillan, N.J., Embry, A.F., and Glass, D.J., eds., Devonian 
   of the World; proceedings of the 2nd international symposium 
   on the Devonian System; Volume II, Sedimentation: Canadian 
   Society of Petroleum Geologists Memoir, 14, p. 377-392.
Usage in Publication:
Ohio Shale

Modifications: Geologic Province: Dominant Lithology:
 Areal limits
 Overview
 Appalachian basin
 

Summary:
Authors follow de Witt (1981) in restricting the New Albany Shale to the Illinois basin and the Ohio Shale to the Appalachian basin. Ohio Shale terminology used wherever Three Lick Bed is recognizable in cores. Unlike de Witt (1981), authors do not use Chattanooga Shale in Knobs outcrop area of south-central KY. Late Devonian Ohio Shale is subdivided into (ascending) Huron Member, Three Lick Bed, and Cleveland Member.
Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Publication:
Chesnut, D.R., Jr., 1992, Stratigraphic and structural framework 
   of the Carboniferous rocks of the central Appalachian basin 
   in Kentucky: Kentucky Geological Survey Bulletin, 11th series, 
   no. 3, 42 p.
Usage in Publication:
Ohio Shale Member

Modifications: Geologic Province: Dominant Lithology:
 Revised
 Appalachian basin
 

Summary:
In this study, the Chattanooga Shale is divided into (ascending) Rhinestreet Shale, Upper Olentangy Shale, Ohio Shale, Bedford Shale, Berea Sandstone, and Sunbury Shale Members. Throughout most of the region, the dominant lithology is black, organic-rich shale (Rhinestreet, Ohio, and Sunbury). The Chattanooga thins westward. Geophysical logs indicate that in the western region, unit consists of only the Sunbury, Berea-Bedford, and Ohio Members, the Rhinestreet and Olentangy having pinched out. The Ohio is dominantly a black shale in the western part of the study area. In the eastern part, the black shale is interbedded with gray shales and in the extreme eastern part it is dominated by gray shales. According to the author, formal nomenclature presented in this report has been accepted by the Kentucky Stratigraphic Nomenclature Committee. Report includes correlation charts, cross-sections, and measured sections.
Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).


Publication:
de Witt, Wallace, Jr., Roen, J.B., and Wallace, L.G., 1993, 
   Stratigraphy of Devonian black shales and associated rocks 
   in the Appalachian basin, IN Roen, J.B., and Kepferle, R.C., 
   eds., Petroleum geology of the Devonian and Mississippian 
   black shale of eastern North America: U.S. Geological Survey 
   Bulletin, 1909-B, p. B1-B57.
Usage in Publication:
Ohio Shale*

Modifications: Geologic Province: Dominant Lithology:
 Overview
 Appalachian basin
 

Summary:
In northern OH, Ohio Shale includes two sequences of black shale, the Huron Member below and the Cleveland Member above. A tongue of Chagrin Shale separates the Huron from the Cleveland in northern and eastern OH. In outcrops in central and southern OH and much of northeastern and central KY, the Three Lick Bed of the Ohio Shale, (a featheredge of the Chagrin Shale) separates the two members. In southern KY and central TN, the Huron and Cleveland are present as beds in the Gassaway Member of the Chattanooga Shale. The Huron is thicker and more extensive than the Cleveland. In northwestern PA and adjacent western NY, the Huron becomes the Dunkirk Shale Member of the Perrysburg.
Source: GNU records (USGS DDS-6; Reston GNULEX).